Raises Remain Steady Among Northeast Ohio Employers

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Post-Recession Pay Adjustments are Stable

With raises over the few years to 2014 holding steady at 3% both locally and nationally, the results of the 2014-2015 ERC Wage & Salary Adjustment Survey came as no surprise - both the actual & projected overall average adjustments in 2014's survey remained at 2.9%. Figure 1 below provides an overview of actual and projected increases in Northeast Ohio since 2004, and more specifically, illustrates this post-recession consistency from 2012-2014 (not to mention the 2.9% increase projected for 2015 in 2014’s survey).

Raises are the Norm

Of the 145 participating organizations that reported data in 2014, only 4% of the total sample indicated that they did not provide raises in 2014 and an equal percentage indicated they also would not be providing raises in 2015. As shown in Figure 2, these figures are right on target with 2013's predictions and have not only fully recovered from the recession, but have actually surpassed pre-recession levels. Ultimately, it seems that although employers are not providing larger increases in terms of percentages, at the very least some pay increase has once again become almost universally expected.
Read this article...

5 Potential Benefits of Telecommuting

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

benefits of telecommuting 5 Potential Benefits of Telecommuting

It’s Monday morning. You hear the beeping noise from your alarm clock. You get up, ready for the work week ahead.  While still in your pajamas, you head to your morning pot of coffee, make some breakfast and shuffle over to the kitchen table or maybe your home office. You sit down and open up your computer and start opening emails from the weekend, or maybe a report that’s due in the next couple of days. This is what more and more employees in America are becoming accustomed to: Telecommunicating.

Since 2005, telecommunicating has grown by nearly 80%. But what are the benefits of telecommuting for both the employee and the employer? And what do you do if your employer doesn’t allow telecommunicating at the workplace quite yet? Here are the facts and some helpful tips about telecommunicating in today’s modern workforce.
Read this article...

Challenges of an Aging Workforce: The Non-Profit Perspective

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Challenges of an Aging Workforce: The Non-Profit Perspective

Recently, much attention is being paid on a global scale to the negative impact that an aging, or in some countries even "super-aged," population will have on the global economy in the near future.

One industry where news of this generational shift in the workforce is not necessarily "new" is in the non-profit sector. For 10 years or more, researchers have been projecting that as many as three-quarters of all Executive Directors/CEOs of non-profit organizations plan to retire in the next several years.

The recession put many of these retirements on hold temporarily, but as the economic recovery builds, these impending retirements are now becoming a reality in the non-profit world. So, while concerns over global economic indicators make the headlines in the national news, let's take a look at how these generational shifts are impacting the non-profit world more specifically.
Read this article...

Can Fantasy Football Be Good for the Workplace?

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Can Fantasy Football Be Good for the Workplace?

Even though summer may be coming to an end, it doesn’t mean winter boots and hot chocolate quite yet. Millions of people, predominantly men, are excited for another season: football season.

As people shed a tear putting away their shorts and tank tops, others are excited to dust off the dirt from their lucky jersey and get ready to root for their beloved team in hopes that this year will be the year to “win it all.” NFL and college football only scratches the surface of another football season: fantasy football. 

The Stats

With approximately 33.2 million people participating in fantasy football in 2014, it would be unrealistic to think that it wouldn’t come up in conversation or happen at the workplace.
Read this article...

3 Surprising Social Media Uses for HR

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

3 Surprising Social Media Uses for HR

When we hear "social media" and "HR" in the same sentence, it's usually in a negative context. "How can we keep employees off of social media at work?" or "I saw something bad on a candidates social media profile, what do I do now?"

But social media can also be used creatively in several areas of the HR function. Consider the following uses for social media that you may not have considered:

Employee Communications

Communicating important inner-office or organizational updates to employees often falls upon HR departments. The standard mass email can be a great medium for getting a quick message out, but what if your communications requires more collaboration, input or feedback?
Read this article...

What is Organizational Climate?

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

What is Organizational Climate?

Perhaps one of the most important and significant characteristics of a great workplace is its organizational climate.

Organizational climate, while defined differently by many researchers and scholars, generally refers to the degree to which an organization focuses on and emphasizes:
Read this article...

20 Common HR Metrics and their Formulas

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

20 Common HR Metrics and their Formulas

How often does your HR department measure its effectiveness? HR metrics and measurements can be powerful in showing us areas where we could improve and better meet the needs of our organization and its employees. They can also help provide meaningful data to help us make good decisions for our business and department.

There are an endless array of HR metrics you can use spanning payroll, compensation, benefits, engagement, retention, training, and more – all of which can provide incredible insight into how your HR function is performing. But, some measurements are more important than others depending on your organization’s goals, strategy, and the data it can feasibly track, analyze, and use. Four crucial considerations that HR professionals need to consider when using HR metrics include:
Read this article...

What is the HIPAA Privacy Rule? An Overview

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

What is the HIPAA Privacy Rule? An Overview

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the HIPAA Privacy Rule "establishes national standards to protect individuals’ medical records and other personal health information and applies to health plans, health care clearinghouses, and those health care providers that conduct certain health care transactions electronically."

HIPAA stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Title I of the Act protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. Title II of the Act requires the establishment of national standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers for providers, health insurance plans, and employers.

Under Title II, the Privacy Rule, also known as The Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information, establishes a set of national standards for the protection of certain health information.
Read this article...

Span of Control: How Many Employees Should Your Supervisors Manage?

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Span of Control How Many Employees Should Your Supervisors Manage supervising employees effectively ideal span of control

How many employees do your supervisors manage? Has your organization considered the effects of what narrow or wide supervisory and managerial spans of control mean for your employees and the levels of support and empowerment they receive on-the-job?

Have you considered how your decisions regarding the number of levels of reporting in your organization and given to your supervisors and managers influence job satisfaction, communication practices, and your overall organizational culture? The structure of your organization matters for these reasons and more.

Defining span of control

Span of control refers to the number of subordinates that can be managed effectively and efficiently by supervisors or managers in an organization. Typically, it is either narrow or wide resulting in a flatter or more hierarchical organizational structure. Each type has its inherent advantages and disadvantages.

Narrow Span

Advantages Disadvantages
  • Have more levels of reporting in the organization, resulting in a more heirarchical organization
  • Supervisors can spend time with employees and supervise them more closely
  • Creates more development, growth, and advancement opportunities
  • More expensive (high cost of management staff, office, etc.)
  • More supervisory involvement in work could lead to less empowerment and delegation and more micromanagement
  • Tends to result in communication difficulties and excessive distance between the top and bottom levels in the organization

Wide Span

Advantages Disadvantages
  • Have fewer levels of reporting in the organization, resulting in a more flexible, flatter organization
  • Ideal for supervisors mainly responsible for answering questions and helping to solve employees problems
  • Encourages empowerment of employees by giving more responsibility, delegation and decision-making power to them
  • Tends to result in greater communication efficiencies and frequent exposure to the top level of the organization
  • May lead to overloaded supervisors if employees require much task direction, support, and supervision
  • May not provide adequate support to employees leading to decreased morale or job satisfaction

Optimal span of control

Three or four levels of reporting typically are sufficient for most organizations, while four to five are generally sufficient for all organizations but the largest organizations (Hattrup, 1993). This is consistent with ERC’s survey findings as well. Ideally in an organization, according to modern organizational experts is approximately 15 to 20 subordinates per supervisor or manager. However, some experts with a more traditional focus believe that 5-6 subordinates per supervisor or manager is ideal. In general, however, optimum span of control depends on various factors including:

  • Organization size: The size of an organization is a great influencer. Larger organizations tend to have wider spans of control than smaller organizations.
  • Nature of an organization: The culture of an organization can influence; a more relaxed, flexible culture is consistent with wider; while a hierarchical culture is consistent with narrow. It is important to consider the current and desired culture of the organization when determining.
  • Nature of job: Routine and low complexity jobs/tasks require less supervision than jobs that are inherently complicated, loosely defined and require frequent decision making. Consider wider for jobs requiring less supervision and narrower for more complex and vague jobs.
  • Skills and competencies of manager: More experienced supervisors or managers can generally be wider than less experienced supervisors. It’s best to also consider to what degree supervisors and managers are responsible for technical aspects of the job (non-managerial duties).
  • Employees skills and abilities: Less experienced employees require more training, direction, and delegation (closer supervision, narrow); whereas more experienced employees requires less training, direction, and delegation (less supervision, wider).
  • Type of interaction between supervisors and employees: More frequent interaction/supervision is characteristic of a narrower.  Less interaction, such as supervisors primarily just answering questions and helping solve employee problems, is characteristic of a wider. The type of interaction you want your supervisors and managers to engage in with their employees should be consistent with the control they are given.

In addition, special consideration should be given to the direct reports of executive and senior management levels. Typically, the number of direct reports for these individuals are lower than supervisors and managers as too many direct reports at these levels can complicate communication and lengthen response time for crucial decisions.  

Sources:

  • Bell, R. R. & McLaughlin, F. S. (1977). Span of control in organizations. Industrial Management.
  • Davison, B. (2003). Management span of control: how wide is too wide? Journal of Business Strategy.
  • Gupta, A. (2010). Organization’s size and span of control. Practical Management: Transforming Theories into Practice.
  • Hattrup, G. P. (1993). How to establish the proper span of control for managers. Industrial Management.
  • Juneja, H. Span of control in an organization.

Interested in learning more about training your supervisors?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a video highlighting our process and a brochure featuring our courses, delivery methods, and success stories.

Preview Supervisory Training

 

A New Kind of Skills Gap

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

A New Kind of Skills Gap

A popular catch-phrase, and somewhat counter-intuitive concept given the unemployment rate in past years, the “skills gap” is a major stumbling block along the path to economic recovery for employers, education institutions, and new job seekers alike.

In the most traditional sense, this gap is simply a disconnect between the skills or areas of study being selected or taught to students and the skills required in the jobs employers are trying to fill to fit their business needs. However, in a 2014 survey published by The Economist Intelligence Unit employers report a somewhat different kind of skills gap between their desired skill set and that of the new college graduates they are encountering as job applicants.
Read this article...