Some HR Management Jobs See Salary Increases

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The results of the 2011 ERC Salary Survey show the rising of some HR management salaries – mainly those specializing in a certain aspect of HR such as compensation, training, and recruiting.

According to the survey, the median salary for a Compensation/Benefits Manager rose 32% from 2009 and 12% from 2010. Additionally, the median salary for a Training Manager increased 24% from 2009 and 3% from 2010. Recruiting Managers also experienced a modest increase of nearly 7% from 2009.

The survey, however, shows that salaries for HR Managers continue to remain flat. The median salary for HR Managers showed no significant change from 2009 or 2010, remaining around $65,013.

Median HR Management Salaries

Additional Resources

More info about ERC Salary Surveys: click here
Other compensation surveys: click here

Majority of Local Employers Hiring New College Graduates

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The results of the 2011 Intern & Recent Grad Pay Rates & Practices Survey, conducted by ERC and NOCHE, showed that slightly over two-thirds (67%) of Northeast Ohio employers were in the process of hiring or planning to hire new graduates for positions in their organizations. The widespread majority of employers hire these graduates for entry-level positions, though some organizations hire them for mid-level/non-supervisory roles.

According to employers, the most common criteria they look for when hiring new graduates is work experience, interpersonal/communication skills, professionalism, major, and work ethic.  Many of these factors are also used to determine salary, along with professional credentials (such as certifications and internships/co-ops).

The survey also shows that average starting salaries for recent graduates vary depending on the type of degree. An engineering degree showed the highest average starting salary, while a communications degree showed the lowest average starting salary in the survey.

Average starting salaries for college degrees

Degree Obtained

Average Starting Salary

Bachelors, Engineering

$51,455

Bachelors, Management

$50,000

Bachelors, Computer Science

$47,250

Bachelors, Information Technology

$43,500

Bachelors, Accounting

$43,400

Bachelors, Sales

$40,000

Bachelors, Marketing

$37,333

Masters, Business Administration

$37,000

Bachelors, Business Administration

$32,571

Bachelors, Communications

$31,000

View the Intern & Recent Graduate Pay Rates & Practices Survey

This survey reports data from Northeast Ohio employers about their internship and recent graduate employment and pay practices.

View the Results

6 Ways to Manage New ADA & Legal Changes

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The final 2011 ADA regulations had important implications for HR and managers when managing employees’ medical conditions and impairments. Here are six ways we gave to strategically manage this issue in particular and other legal changes that may affect your business in the future.

Meet with your HR and management team. When any new employment law or regulation is implemented, as a strategic measure, it’s important for your HR team and organization to determine how this law will impact your organizational objectives. Meet with your management and HR teams to discuss how the law or regulation will influence your HR operations, affect your ability to attract and retain key talent, and prompt new liabilities or risks that could affect your bottom line or operations. From there, you’ll need to determine what tactical issues need to be addressed, such as implementing training to your management staff, revising and communicating policies, adjusting HR processes, and incorporating new risk management processes.

Revise policies. In the case of the final regulations pertaining to ADA (as well as other laws and regulations), it’s important that you review your policies and employee handbook to ensure that language is adjusted to meet the changing definition of disability and is consistent with the language within the regulation. Remember, the definition of disability has become much broader, so your policies should reflect this change.

Review and adjust accommodation process. No longer is focusing on the question of whether an illness or condition is a disability the focus of the ADA law, as many conditions will now fall under this definition. Rather, the changes to ADA emphasize developing accommodations for employees with impairment. Key questions you should ask are how is your accommodation process administered? Is an HR representative in charge of this process or are line managers? With the new regulations, it’s recommended that HR:

  • Lead and manage the accommodation process consistently throughout the organization versus managers. This ensures that the process is run the same throughout the organization, reducing potential liabilities.
  • Approach the ADA process like FMLA and use standard forms and processes instead of un-standardized doctors’ notes and evaluations. Consider your approaches during the pre-employment process with applicants as well as when current employees develop an illness or condition while they are employed.
  • Create a standard internal form for employees to use which provides a checklist of possible conditions or ability to write the condition or impairment and summarizes alternative accommodations that apply to the condition, or a guide for a discussion of these accommodations. The form may also include a doctor’s signature if necessary versus using doctor’s notes.

Review job descriptions. Ensure that job descriptions specify the essential job functions of each job – and also be sure that these essential functions are actually essential. The courts have been critical of how essential functions are defined. Also, be cautious of defining too many tasks as essential. A good rule of thumb is using a job analysis to rate or rank how important and critical certain tasks are to a job and how frequently they are conducted, and to account for job incumbent and supervisory perspectives.

Train and communicate. When a policy or process is revised, be sure to communicate the changes as soon as possible to managers who are in charge of implementing and executing them. With ADA, front-line managers will likely be the first to know about an employee’s illness or condition and need to understand how to handle requests for accommodations such as:

  • Job modifications
  • Schedule changes
  • Environmental issues (temperature, work setting, stress, exertion, etc.)
  • Motor or cognitive impairments
  • Mental issues (depression, anxiety, etc.)

Managers need to know how to respond, act, and when to refer to HR – and how negative or inappropriate reactions to these requests or even knowledge of a medical condition can cause liability or risk to the organization. They also need to be trained on how to effectively manage employees with mental or physical impairments in terms of scheduling, direction, support, and even modification of interpersonal interactions.

Last but not least, stay ahead of the curve. In HR, we unfortunately tend to react to a problem, a new law or regulation, or a new fad (i.e. what every other employer is doing) versus staying ahead of trends and upcoming legal agendas and issues that will affect our business. This often results in poorly executed tactics, lawsuits, and other issues that could have been avoided had we been more strategic. By being proactive and staying on top of changes emerging in the market, we can help our business manage its risk, legal, and HR issues more effectively, and become a more strategic partner within our management team.

Please note that by providing you with research information that may be contained in this article, ERC is not providing a qualified legal opinion. As such, research information that ERC provides to its members should not be relied upon or considered a substitute for legal advice. The information that we provide is for general employer use and not necessarily for individual application. 

Additional Resources

ERC provides a number of resources to help you stay updated on important legal and HR trends and issues, as well as training for your managers on employment law and employee relations.

ERC Training
To visit our ERC Training Program and Courses page: click here.

Supervisor & Management Training
We offer several courses for supervisors and managers on topics like employment law, workplace bullying, and general employee relations topics like communication, interpersonal skills, and more. To learn more, click here.

HR Project Support
From employee handbook and policy updates to job description revisions, we offer assistance with HR projects to help your organization stay compliant. For more information, please contact consulting@yourerc.com.

 

ERC Partners with ADP

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ERC has partnered with ADP, one of the world’s largest providers of business outsourcing solutions, to offer its members significant discounts on ADP’s Workforce Now solution. ERC members will receive the first month at no charge and 50% off implementation fees.

ADP Workforce Now is the premier single-source, integrated solution that offers robust HR, benefits administration, payroll, time and attendance and talent management functionality specifically designed for mid-market organizations with 50 to 999 employees.

“The Workforce Now product is a great fit for many of our members,” said Pat Perry, president of ERC. “With ADP’s services not only do you work with a trusted name, but you can save your organization a lot of time and money.”

About ADP
Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (Nasdaq: ADP), with nearly $9 billion in revenues and about 550,000 clients, is one of the world's largest providers of business outsourcing solutions. Leveraging over 60 years of experience, ADP offers a wide range of HR, payroll, tax and benefits administration solutions from a single source. ADP's easy-to-use solutions for employers provide superior value to companies of all types and sizes. ADP is also a leading provider of integrated computing solutions to auto, truck, motorcycle, marine and recreational vehicle dealers throughout the world. For more information visit www.ADP.com.

ERC members invited to LGA SHRM Event

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Lake Geauga County SHRM is hosting a 7 strategic credit hour class for HRCI re-certification called Results Driven Leadership presented by Sara Christiansen from Ideation Consulting.  This seminar will be held on June 16th, 2011 from 8am-4pm at the United Way located at 9285 Progress Parkway, Mentor, OH 44060. 

ERC members can receive a discount if they register online at www.lgashrm.org and enter the code "ERC-ERC" to receive the $99 rate. The regular rate for non-ERC or LGA SHRM members is $125.  Registration includes continental breakfast, boxed lunch and afternoon snack.

Growing Your Rising Stars

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Your organization may have some rising stars – high achieving employees with the ability to move up in your organization and carry the demands of your organization’s most challenging and promising opportunities. You may love their work, think highly of their potential, but notice a few skills or abilities that need some development before promoting them to the next level. Here are a few ways to grow and engage your rising stars.

Uncover their (and your) objectives.

According to a 2011 study conducted by the Corporate Leadership Council, 1 in 5 emerging leaders believe their personal aspirations are different than the plans of their organizations. Obviously, there’s a strong disconnect between what emerging leaders want from a career and what they think their organization wants from them in the future. Before your organization pours resources and time into the process of developing these employees, be sure that both of your objectives match. Similarly, in order to know how to develop your rising stars, your organization needs to determine its long-term objectives and the talent it will need to achieve those. For example, will your business be expanding? Will its product/service line change? What skills will it need? How will technology affect your workplace? When will leaders retire or move on? Growing your best people often requires good workforce and succession planning.

Place on intense assignments and in challenging roles.

Research shows that intense, challenging, and risky assignments are the best learning experiences for growing leadership capabilities – and more meaningful than traditional job rotation programs. These developmental assignments not only engage the rising star, but also allow your organization to evaluate how well the employee performs on new challenges they have not experienced and where further development is needed. Similarly, rising stars should be placed in challenging roles and positions – perhaps an undeveloped area of the business, a department that is underperforming, or a potential business opportunity that has not yet been ceased. It’s important not to shield rising stars from the realities and stressful situations they will face in future roles. Rather, throw them into the fire, but build in support.

Provide formal training and development opportunities.

While job experiences are one of the best ways to grow rising stars, there’s no replacement for the classroom. Seminars, activities, and instruction are a necessary supplement to leadership development initiatives and frequently are used to grow capabilities in key leadership topics like change management, presentation, communication, influence, and negotiation. Other formal development opportunities such as attendance at conferences, certification programs, advanced degrees, participation on boards, and involvement in professional associations can all be helpful in growing capabilities. Rising stars will need to acquire knowledge not only in their organizations and through experiences, but also externally from facilitators, coaches, and peers.

Engage in regular feedback and dialogue.

A conversation once or twice a year isn’t going to grow your best employees. Development done right requires frequent conversations and dialogue. This dialogue can address how the employee is performing and provide direction, guidance, and coaching on new stretch tasks and development opportunities. It can also help gauge their engagement and satisfaction with the initiative and how they are progressing in their development plan. These conversations often can help avoid derailment – failure or underperformance at the next level – a common problem many leadership development programs experience.

Beyond one-on-one dialogue, 360 feedback is another common leadership development tool that can help your rising star determine how their style and competencies are perceived by others in the workplace such as managers, coworkers, and customers. The results can be used for follow-up coaching and training.

Use your current leaders as resources.

While most development responsibilities fall on HR or line managers, seasoned leaders and top managers can (and should) be actively involved in mentoring and developing rising stars – not just evaluating and selecting who these leaders will be.  Oftentimes, exposure to current leaders and tapping into their perspectives, knowledge, and experiences can be very effective in growing future leaders if they want to be engaged in the developmental process. It can also engage your rising stars, providing them with opportunities to interact and build relationships with your senior staff. Plus, your organization may save on other developmental costs such as use of an external coach or mentor that is not as ‘in tune’ with the workings of your company.

A range of work experiences, developmental activities, dialogue and feedback, and use of current leaders is a simple recipe for growing your rising stars into higher levels of your organization and engaging them.

Additional Resources

The Emerging Leaders Series
Have the emerging leaders within your organization been identified? Do they have the skills and knowledge needed to best represent your organization? This two-part series covers professional etiquette in and out of the workplace, communication skills, and the traits of a strong leader. Participants will learn tools to present themselves more effectively and enhance their contribution to the organization. 

Leadership Development Training
Developing your leaders or managers? Check out the range of courses we offer to help you grow talent of all levels and especially managers and leaders. Click here

Coaching, 360s, & Talent Management
ERC offers several developmental services including employee, manager, and leadership coaching, 360 feedback initiatives, as well as assistance with talent management projects including workforce and succession planning to support your leadership development initiatives. For more information, please contact consulting@yourerc.com.

Three-Quarters of Employers Offer Supervisory/Management Training

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According to the results of the 2011-2012 ERC Policies & Benefits Survey, most employers in Northeast Ohio provide supervisors and managers with training in supervisory and managerial skills. Most commonly, 75% of local employers say that they use employers association supervisory/management development courses to train employees compared to only 32% of employers that use college supervisory development courses.

“The survey’s results suggest that local organizations find value in the supervisory/management training provided by employers associations like ERC. Within the training we provide, participants learn how to apply a variety of managerial and interpersonal skills including dealing with the everyday challenges of being a manager and also receive a variety of resources to support them in their managerial roles,” says Chris Kutsko, Director of Learning and Development at ERC.

She adds, “Many of our clients find tremendous value in the quality, delivery, support, and affordability of our supervisory and managerial training beyond what other providers offer.”

Additional Resources

More information about this survey: click here
Upcoming training and programs on this topic: click here

5 Common Management Challenges

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Communication, management of conflict and performance, and management of potential liabilities are all challenges managers experience. Here are some practical ways to deal with these common management challenges and support and develop your managers.

Communicate.

Managers are frequently not aware of the quality of their communication about expectations, changes, procedures, and other work-related issues, or how their communication or interpersonal style is perceived by their employees. Help managers understand their unique communication and interpersonal style and how to “flex” this style in different situations. Provide managers with communication templates, scripts, tips, or checklists. Engage in role-play or dialogue with the manager to help them practice their skills and identify opportunities for improvement. Additionally, educate managers on common communication breakdowns and how to avoid them and encourage managers to notice signs of communication problems (misunderstandings, consistent performance problems, etc.). When all else fails, provide a personal coach if communication problems persist

Resolve conflict.

Many managers ignore problems and do not address conflicts with their employees or work team directly. Whether these are performance problems, conflicts among team members, issues of trust, or personality clashes, managers are challenged to confront and address problems head-on and as they emerge, diffuse employees’ feelings and emotions about the problem, listen to both parties’ needs and desires, derive win-win solutions that lead to more productive and positive work relations, and prevent conflict in the future by nurturing positive coworker relationships and recognizing potential for conflict or problems early.

Manage performance.

Managers must balance meeting goals, managing workloads, and motivating employees. These issues coupled with the fact that many managers are ill-equipped to provide regular and constructive feedback and may not understand the importance of documenting performance can make managing performance challenging. To support them, build on-going performance feedback into the performance management process to ensure accountability. Create an easy method for managers to document performance like a database, log, or diary. Provide support tools for managers such as rewards, recognition, training, and development to recognize and build performance. Most importantly, train managers in topics such as performance management, coaching, and feedback since many will have had no experience with these.

Handle protected employees.

Most managers are not well-versed in administering ADA, FMLA, and other laws that protect certain groups of employees, but unknowingly find themselves managing an employee that requires an accommodation, leave of absence, or falls into a protected class. These situations need to be handled delicately due to their legal nature, so make managers aware of:

  • Legal basics such as conditions or disabilities that are protected
  • How to determine essential functions and reasonable accommodations
  • Requirements associated with FMLA (eligibility, length of time, etc.)
  • Types of employees that are protected under law (gender, race, national origin, etc.)
  • Hiring and interviewing liabilities (questions to ask/not ask, etc.)

Administer policies fairly and consistently.

One of the most common challenges for managers is treating employees fairly and consistently. A manager may allow policies and rules to be disregarded by some employees and not others – or may disregard employment policies altogether. “Stretching” the rules for some employees can open up a range of potential liabilities and perceptions of bias and favoritism that have negative far-reaching affects in the workplace. Be sure to write clear policies and let managers know when changes have been made. Set clear criteria for making employment decisions, particularly where managers need to distinguish between employees (recognition, reward, development, etc.). Also, clearly differentiate between the policies in which managers have discretion to implement and those in which they do not.

Addressing these management challenges sooner then later can prevent your organization from experiencing many problems and liabilities. It’s never too early to ensure that your supervisors and managers have the skills, tools, and support to do their jobs effectively, so if your supervisor is just starting out, consider developing these important skills as soon as possible.

Additional Resources

Supervisory Series
In the series, participants will gain an understanding of their role as a supervisor as well as employment law as it relates to common supervisory issues. They will also learn how to apply basic managerial and interpersonal skills including dealing with the everyday challenges of being a supervisor, communicating effectively with others, resolving workplace conflict, managing performance, and coaching. Click here to register or click here to learn how we can bring this training on-site to your organization.

Strategic Legal Update
Stay up to date on all of the most recent law and policy news with our blog

Coaching & Performance Management Services
ERC offers a full range of services to support your organization’s performance management activities. We also offer one-on-one coaching services to help your build and develop your manager’s skills. For more information about these services, please contact consulting@yourerc.com.

Healthy Living Ideas: Having Trouble Sleeping?

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The importance of sleep is underscored by the symptoms experienced by those suffering from sleep problems. People suffering from sleep disorders do not get adequate or restorative sleep, and sleep deprivation is associated with a number of both physical and emotional disturbances.

Below are suggested herbal sleep aids supplements to help get a good night's sleep.

1. Chamomile: Chamomile is one of nature's oldest and gentlest herbal sleep aids. It is most often drunk as a tea, which has a mild and pleasant taste. In addition to promoting calm and restfulness, chamomile is also used in cases of stomach irritation.

2. Valerian: Valerian is a root that has long been used as an herbal sleep aid. It has a characteristic smell – just like old socks. Valerian can be used to help occasional sleeplessness, but is also particularly helpful taken long-term.

3. Melatonin: Melatonin is a hormone that the body produces at night. It is sometimes called the "sleep hormone" because it is so important to healthy sleep. People who are blind, who suffer from jet lag, or who live in places with extended sunlight hours may have trouble sleeping because their bodies do not produce enough melatonin.

4. SAMe: SAMe (S-adenosyl-methionine) is an amino acid derivative, and is found normally in the body. It is typically used as an antidepressant, but is also commonly used to treat chronic fatigue syndrome or as an herbal sleep aid. Its actions in the body help to promote healthy sleep cycles, especially when taken daily for several weeks.

5. Tryptophan: Tryptophan is an amino acid that is a precursor to seratonin. Low serotonin levels can cause irritability, anxiety, and sleeplessness, so adding more tryptophan to your diet can help you relax and will promote healthier sleep patterns.

Health Care Reform Lunch Forum

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The complexities of health care reform and the decisions that will need to be made by legislators, regulators and other policymakers over the next several years are daunting.  Ohio’s policymakers need your insight regarding the important considerations of the employer community regarding how reform will affect the role employers’ play in sponsoring access to health insurance options.

As a result, the State of Ohio has contracted with The Ohio State University’s John Glenn School of Public Affairs to assess the effects of ongoing market forces and federal health reform on Ohio’s trend for employer-sponsored health insurance.  Given the many changes to take place over the next several years, their team cannot simply project future trends based on past experience.  Therefore, they are seeking input from employers to understand what they anticipate doing under different health care reform scenarios, including a lack of change that could occur from the repeal of the legislation.

ERC, the Health Action Council (HAC) and The Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE), have agreed to co-sponsor an employer forum in Northeast Ohio to solicit employer insights.  This input will assist policymakers better understand the health-related policy actions employers require to support the challenges of offering employer-sponsored health insurance and make Ohio a preferred place to do business.

This forum will take place on May 23rd from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at ERC’s Workplace Center. Please RSVP to Jasmin Denholm at 440-947-1274 or jdenholm@ercnet.org.  There is no cost and seating is limited.

We hope that you can join us for this important discussion—it is an opportunity to directly advise our state’s policymakers on your concerns and ideas related to the implementation of reform.