3 Thinking Skills That Strong Leaders Must Have

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3 Thinking Skills That Strong Leaders Must Have

WRITTEN BY DR. DAVID WATTERSON, FOUNDER OF ERC'S AFFILIATE, WATTERSON & ASSOCIATES, INC.

Strong leaders must have robust and balanced thinking skills. These skills are critical prerequisites for high performance as they are needed to process information and then communicate clearly business plans and strategies. Leaders must know how to manage words and information. However, we live in a time when people’s writing and verbal skills seem to be declining.
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Are Supervisors Allowed to Yell?

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Are Supervisors Allowed to Yell?

Work can be stressful at times. Projects may be piling up or sales goals aren’t being met. Depending on the leadership in your organization, you may come across a supervisor or manager who tends to communicate in a more aggressive fashion, by yelling. A supervisor’s tendency to yell at employees may seem like it is the “wrong” way to manage people. But is it?


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Respect: The Key to Customer Service Excellence

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customer service respect treating customers with respect define respect in customer service Respect: The Keys to Customer Service Excellence

“Products and prices can be duplicated, but a strong customer service culture can’t be copied!” This quote by speaker Jerry Fritz, truly embodies why organizations should put more focus on their customer service training.

The foundation for a great relationship with customers is respect. When respect is built, it is much easier to handle unexpected and unpleasant situations.
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3 Keys to Communication: Listening, Nonverbal, and Written

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3 Keys to Communication: Listening, Nonverbal, and Written

“Communication works for those who work at it.”

—John Powell

Communication is part of the foundation to any successful working relationship. Effective communication includes clarity, conciseness, and coherence between all parties. However, that clarity, conciseness, and coherence doesn’t always come naturally in a relationship.


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5 Things Every Supervisor Should Know About Negotiating

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5 Things Every Supervisor Should Know About Negotiating

Negotiation is simply an exchange of information aimed at reaching an agreement. However, supervisors need to be conscientious when it comes to negotiating with their employees.

During negotiations, it is critical for any supervisor or manager to be able to communicate clearly, concisely, and persuasively, use probing skills to uncover interests, needs, and information, to invent solutions, and to actively listen to ensure understanding, information gathering, and to build relationships.
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How To Avoid These 5 Common Leadership Pitfalls

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Leadership teams have the ability to shape and drive their organization when they can be effective but with individuals coming from many different backgrounds and roles, challenges are bound to arise. Differing opinions lead to conflict, distrust amongst team members, ineffective communication techniques, lack of accountability, and destructive criticism. All potentially result in setting your team up for failure. In order to address these potential pitfalls, you need to identify them first. Here’s 5 common leadership pitfalls and how to avoid them:
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Begin the Conversation Now: Developing an FLSA Communication Plan

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Begin the Conversation Now: Developing an FLSA Communication Plan

The U.S. Department of Labor passed legislation regarding the FLSA Overtime Rule in 2016. This new ruling, which established a new salary threshold, effective December 1, 2016, prompts many organizations to reevaluate and update their policies and procedures in relation to employees who are currently classified as exempt.


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4 Types of Social Styles: How They Create a Versatile Workplace

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4 Types of Social Styles: How They Create a Versatile Workplace

The Social Style Model (TRACOM Group) is an interpersonal skills effectiveness model that designates patterns of behavior in the workplace. Organizations and training professionals can utilize the model to demonstrate how others perceive a person’s behavior, and to improve individuals’ relationship-building performance by being aware of the unique social styles of those around them.

This model is based on two behavioral dimensions:

1. Assertiveness is the degree to which an individual asks questions versus makes statements. Those low on the assertiveness scale tend to make requests (more asking), while others higher on the assertiveness spectrum make demands (more telling).

2. Responsiveness refers to how individuals express emotions. People low on the responsiveness scale tend to exert high self-control over their emotional displays, and those high on the responsiveness spectrum are more emotionally expressive.  

The combination of these two dimensions forms the four types of Social Style.

The 4 Social Styles explained:

  1. Amiable individuals prefer to ask questions rather than give orders, and feel at ease expressing their emotions.
  2. Analytical individuals control their emotions to a high degree and also prefer to inquire rather than make demands.
  3. Driving individuals display high emotional control and are highly assertive, so they are comfortable with giving orders.
  4. Expressive individuals feel comfortable expressing their emotions and are also highly assertive.

There is no “best” social style, because each style has both positive and negative characteristics.

Why do Social Styles matter? The role of versatility

Recognition of Social Style has many benefits, as being able to identify others’ social preferences allows you to be more versatile in the workplace. Awareness of Social Style can enhance several dimensions that are crucial to success at work, including teamwork, conflict management, communications, sales performance, and leadership performance. For example, managers with higher versatility perform better at leading teams, coaching others, and are more likely to be promoted.

Understanding the social styles of your coworkers and leaders helps you modify your behavior and respond to others in appropriate ways based on their unique style. This can lead to more effective interactions in any social setting, particularly in the workplace.

ERC provides SOCIAL STYLE training that improves skills & improves performance.

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