How to Re-Engage Employees Who Are Ready to Leave

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How to Re-Engage Employees Who Are Ready to Leave

Do you currently have an employee who has one foot out the door? There are endless reasons for voluntary turnover, and data from 2018’s NorthCoast 99 Top Performer Survey specifically identifies four of the most commonly cited sources of disengagement.

Employees are likely to chase after new advancement opportunities and more competitive compensation, while fleeing from a lack of flexibility and a lack of organizational support.

Once employees become disengaged, it can be a struggle to change their minds in a way that makes them want to stay.

Consider the following 4 ideas to re-engage those employees who could be on their way out.

1. Keep Lines of Communication Open

If regular employee-manager conversations don’t occur, you might find yourself quite surprised when you hear a top performer express intentions of leaving the company. Listen to all concerns intently and take them seriously. Consider preventive measures such as conducting regular “stay” interviews or employee engagement pulse surveys. Keeping your employees engaged requires continuous communication.

By maintaining an awareness of how your people are doing and how they feel about their work and roles in the organization, there will be more time and opportunity to engage your talent base.

It could be easier to remedy employee issues as they come to surface, rather than continuously cycling through the talent attraction and hiring process as a result of turnover.

2. Get Them “Un-stuck”

Give disengaged employees somewhere to go within the company. When you give them the opportunity to re-engage they feel less inclined to take their talent and knowledge elsewhere. Advancement opportunities allow top performers to feel continuously challenged and in charge of their learning, which not only serves to fulfill their needs for growth, but also benefits an organization’s competitive advantage (Deloitte).

Take note of the knowledge, skills, and unique attributes your organizational talent pool consists of, and figure out how you can better utilize your employees’ capabilities.

When they feel ready to move on to an external opportunity, offer to move these individuals into a new set of responsibilities in which they can flourish. And when you add new work to their plate, make sure their compensation is adjusted accordingly.  Having a talent-management system in place can facilitate this process. (Ultimate Software is an ERC Preferred Partner offering succession planning and talent development services.)

3. Recognize and Reward

A number of employees could be on their way out because they feel unappreciated for their efforts, and are no longer motivated to work for an organization that doesn’t recognize their contributions.

While no employee is likely to turn down a bonus for a job-well-done, money alone is not an effective long-term motivator (Harvard Business Review).

Showing appreciation can take on many forms, such as giving public recognition during staff meetings or interoffice email, awarding extra paid time off, or giving employees the chance to work on challenging projects that provide more work autonomy.

4. Support Work-Life Balance

If organizational policy is rigid and forces individuals to choose between work and family, employees will likely recognize that they have options that will better suit their needs (that don’t include their current employer).

Granting employees more robust benefits such as flexible work schedules, generous parental leave, telecommuting opportunities, and unlimited bereavement leave, is a way to communicate to employees that you recognize they are holistic humans and not productivity machines.

Don’t lose your best people to the competition by hanging on to traditional workplace practices that hold them back from living an enjoyable life.

In the end, if you feel unwilling to put in the effort required to re-engage departing employees, consider whether you can truly afford to lose this talent and adjust accordingly.

 

Interested in learning more about engagement surveys?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a brochure that overviews what is included in ERC's engagement surveys and our process for conducting and assessing.

View the Engagement Brochure

 

10 Crucial Skills for Supervisors to Hone

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The 10 Crucial Skills for Supervisors to Have

Editor's note: This article was originally published in February 2016 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Supervising and managing a group of employees who all have different personalities, skill sets and who may or may not interact well with each other is no easy task. New supervisors are no longer solely responsible for their own results and performance. Instead, they must now facilitate results and success through their employees. One of a supervisor’s main roles is to establish goals and lead a team of people to achieve them.

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3 Thinking Skills That Strong Leaders Must Have

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3 Thinking Skills That Strong Leaders Must Have

WRITTEN BY DR. DAVID WATTERSON, FOUNDER OF ERC'S AFFILIATE, WATTERSON & ASSOCIATES, INC.

Strong leaders must have robust and balanced thinking skills. These skills are critical prerequisites for high performance as they are needed to process information and then communicate clearly business plans and strategies. Leaders must know how to manage words and information. However, we live in a time when people’s writing and verbal skills seem to be declining.
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Are Supervisors Allowed to Yell?

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Are Supervisors Allowed to Yell?

Work can be stressful at times. Projects may be piling up or sales goals aren’t being met. Depending on the leadership in your organization, you may come across a supervisor or manager who tends to communicate in a more aggressive fashion, by yelling. A supervisor’s tendency to yell at employees may seem like it is the “wrong” way to manage people. But is it?


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Respect: The Key to Customer Service Excellence

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customer service respect treating customers with respect define respect in customer service Respect: The Keys to Customer Service Excellence

“Products and prices can be duplicated, but a strong customer service culture can’t be copied!” This quote by speaker Jerry Fritz, truly embodies why organizations should put more focus on their customer service training.

The foundation for a great relationship with customers is respect. When respect is built, it is much easier to handle unexpected and unpleasant situations.
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3 Keys to Communication: Listening, Nonverbal, and Written

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3 Keys to Communication: Listening, Nonverbal, and Written

“Communication works for those who work at it.”

—John Powell

Communication is part of the foundation to any successful working relationship. Effective communication includes clarity, conciseness, and coherence between all parties. However, that clarity, conciseness, and coherence doesn’t always come naturally in a relationship.


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5 Things Every Supervisor Should Know About Negotiating

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5 Things Every Supervisor Should Know About Negotiating

Negotiation is simply an exchange of information aimed at reaching an agreement. However, supervisors need to be conscientious when it comes to negotiating with their employees.

During negotiations, it is critical for any supervisor or manager to be able to communicate clearly, concisely, and persuasively, use probing skills to uncover interests, needs, and information, to invent solutions, and to actively listen to ensure understanding, information gathering, and to build relationships.
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How To Avoid These 5 Common Leadership Pitfalls

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Leadership teams have the ability to shape and drive their organization when they can be effective but with individuals coming from many different backgrounds and roles, challenges are bound to arise. Differing opinions lead to conflict, distrust amongst team members, ineffective communication techniques, lack of accountability, and destructive criticism. All potentially result in setting your team up for failure. In order to address these potential pitfalls, you need to identify them first. Here’s 5 common leadership pitfalls and how to avoid them:
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