5 Tips for Engaging Tenured Employees

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

5 Tips for Engaging Tenured Employees

For many managers or HR professionals, they’ve encountered an entitled tenured employee once or twice in their career. You know, the employee who thinks because they were a top performer in 2007 that they can slack off and still reap the benefits as someone producing twice the results but is half their age. Just because they have company “loyalty.”
Read this article...

Leveraging Employee Engagement to Attract and Retain Top Talent

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Leveraging Employee Engagement to Attract and Retain Top Talent

Pay and work conditions have always been important factors when it comes to obtaining top talent in the workplace. However, employee engagement has been shown to be one of the key factors when it comes to retaining that top talent.

Employee engagement is all about how you feel, how you are respected, how you are listened to, and how you are an integral part of the day to day operation. We talked with Dave Topor, Custom Research Manager at ERC, about employee engagement, and how companies can be sure to retain top talent.
Read this article...

Employee Engagement and Women in the Workplace

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

This is the second article in a series of articles spotlighting women for Women's History Month.

Employee engagement is a great way to retain productive and efficient employees for your company. Susan Pyles, Senior Talent Consultant and Trainer at ERC gave great guidelines for companies to follow when it comes to women in the workplace.
Read this article...

The 5 New Rules of Employee Engagement

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

The rules of employee engagement are changing. If engagement is a priority for your organization, here are the five (5) new rules of employee engagement that your organization needs to know.

 

1. Engagement is not an initiative or a survey - it's embedded into the culture.

Historically, employee engagement has been an employer initiative or an annual survey endeavor. It's been mostly focused on implementing workplace programs, but not addressing systemic, cultural problems that hinder engagement. This traditional approach has had limited success.

Nowadays, the more effective way to improve employee engagement is embedding it into the culture: assessing it on an ongoing basis via surveying, having senior leaders commit to it as a priority, cascading it throughout the organization, and sustaining it.
Read this article...

An Introduction to Employee Engagement Surveys

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

An Introduction to Employee Engagement Surveys

Not only are employee engagement surveys a common initiative that most organizations conduct these days, but they are necessary for any workplace that wants to achieve and retain a highly productive, competent, and motivated workforce.

What is an employee engagement survey? What are the features of a successful project? What should you communicate? How should you follow-up on the results? Here's an introduction to employee engagement surveys that every employer should know.

Employee Engagement Surveys Defined

An employee engagement survey measures employees' collective level of engagement at their organization. Employee engagement is an employee's commitment to, involvement with, emotional attachment to, and satisfaction with their work and organization. Employee engagement drives business outcomes, such as productivity, performance, profitability, and other desirable behavior results in the workplace (such as retention, pride, etc.).
Read this article...

100 Ideas for Employee Engagement Activities

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Employee engagement plays an important role in attracting, retaining, and developing top talent for organizations, and is important to a business' success. There are so many ways to engage employees through recognition and rewards, compensation, training and development, advancement opportunities, work/life and wellness initiatives, leadership and management behavior, community involvement, employee events, among others.

employee engagement activities

Below are 100+ ideas for employee engagement activities:

1. Share stories about how employees' work impacts customers and the organization.

2. Volunteer at a local charity or non-profit organization.

3. Start an internal company newsletter or blog in which employees and leaders can contribute content.

4. Create a wellness committee to implement initiatives around the office.

5. Start every meeting by recognizing one person for a recent accomplishment.

6. Create a job shadowing program for employees to job shadow and learn about other departments in the company.

7. Create a years of service recognition program.

8. Offer a flexible work schedule.

9. Provide employees with job opportunities outside of their regular job duties.

10. Have the leadership team eat lunch in the cafeteria and promote employees coming to talk to them with questions or concerns.

11. Have a no-email day once a month to encourage employees to encourage in-person interaction.

12. Provide on-the-job leadership opportunities for non-management top performers.

13. Have internal training classes once a month for employees to learn more about the company’s products/services.

14. Create an employee idea/suggestion program.

15. Have supervisors write thank you cards to employees, letting them know much their contributions are valued.

16. At staff or team meetings, encourage employees to recognize their fellow co-workers for a job well done.

17. Schedule regular one-on-one meetings with staff.

18. Create an employee of the month award.

19. Allow employees to bring their dog and/or bring their child to work day. 

20. Create succession plans and communicate them to successors.

Engage and Retain

21. Invite top performers to attend a networking or special event with senior leaders.

22. Invite each employee to attend at least one training program each year.

23. Host exercise or yoga classes at the office.

24. Give employees stretch assignments to challenge them.

25. Recognize a personal accomplishment or milestone in employees' lives, such as births of children, weddings, retirements, and professional development achievements.

26. Start a new-hire mentor or buddy program.

27. Meet one-on-one with employees to talk about what they like and dislike about their job.

28. Implement a fitness program or activity.

29. Host an all-staff or team potluck breakfast or lunch.

30. Create a cross-training program.

31. Create employee-led committees for safety, wellness, or other workplace initiatives.

32. Host a community involvement day.

33. Have senior leaders work with non-management employees on projects and assignments.

34. Take a high performing employee out to lunch and/or host a luncheon or breakfast with a small group of employees.

35. Have monthly/quarterly town hall meetings during which senior management reports on the state of the business and employees have a chance to ask questions.

36. Talk about career development with top performers at least once a year.

37. Require that every manager provide ongoing coaching and feedback to their employees.

38. Start a profit sharing or bonus program.

39. Provide employees with extra time off as a reward, perhaps around a holiday.

40. Give employees a day off for their birthday.
 Engage and Retain

41. Host a summer company picnic or outing and a holiday party every year.

42. Do something special for employees when they are take on extra work while another employee is on vacation or out sick/on a medical leave.

43. Create open, comfortable collaboration spaces in which employees can gather together.

44. Implement an open door policy.

45. Match an employee's charitable donation.

46. Have employees participate in developing the organization's mission, vision, values, and strategic direction.

47. Create a mentoring program.

48. Give employees a paid day off to volunteer at a charity or non-profit organization of their choice.

49. Have a different department lead company staff meetings each time. Let the department plan an activity and report on what their department does.

50. Hang a white board (or other type of collaboration board) in the office and each month post a “Question of the Month” and leave markers for employees to write their answers.

51. Support an employee with a personal or work situation, such as a medical issue, loss of a relative, etc.

52. Pay for one professional membership per employee per year.

53. Offer employees to attend a conference paid by the company.

54. Give stretch assignments to top performers.

55. Give top performers the lead on special projects.

56. Create a culture committee comprised of employees.

57. Coordinate an employee appreciation day/week.

58. Allow employees to work from home as needed or on the regular basis.

59. Have a peer nominated employee of the month award.

60. Have non-management employees lead department or team meetings.

Engage and Retain

61. Rotate each person in your department leading a department meeting.

62. Have a welcome celebration and/or activity for newly hired employees.

63. Create a KPI board so employees can track how well they are doing on a daily/weekly basis.

64. Have a praise board in a public place where employees can informally thank other employees.

65. Do a short daily stand up at the beginning of each shift to recap what is going on in the department and business.

66. Coordinate a team-building event or retreat.

67. Start an internal knowledge-sharing group or initiative.

68. Create a book club in your organization on leadership, management, or industry-related topics.

69. Create a personalized learning and development plan for each employee.

70. Offer career counseling or coaching.

71. Implement a creativity and innovation contest.

72. Take candid photos of employees and at events to share on a bulletin board. Every month start with a new board and create an ongoing scrapbook of the old pictures.

73. Contract with a wellness or health coach to come on-site. 

74. Have a monthly birthday celebration for all birthdays in the office.

75. Put fun games and entertainment in a common area, such as a ping–pong table, television, or Wii.

76. Create a leadership development or emerging leaders program.

77. Offer career opportunities and promotions internally before seeking external hires.

78. Offer online training courses.

79. Allow employees to personalize their workspace.

80. Have a field day of outdoor activities or a few field hours during lunches throughout the summer.

Engage and Retain

81. Send top performing employees to a train-the-trainer class so they can help train new associates in their departments.

82. Start a tuition assistance/reimbursement program.

83. Have a company history month, during which employees learn about the history of the company through different activities.

84. Encourage employees to improve at least one thing about their job each quarter that helps the department and/or company.

85. Have senior leaders make "rounds" around the office each week (if possible) to interact and communicate with employees.

86. Have the CEO or top executive write a column for the internal company newsletter or blog.

87. Highlight a different employee in each internal newsletter. 

88. Give surprise half days to the whole staff.

89. Create an internal job board on which positions are posted internally before looking for outside candidates.

90. Create a company vegetable garden together as a staff.

91. Have employees set yearly professional and developmental goals.

92. Celebrate employee work anniversaries; give employees a gift and a card on their anniversary.

93. Give all employees a compensation increase each year. Differentiate increases based on performance.

94. Offer educational opportunities or programs related to stress management.

95. Have casual dress Fridays.

96. Get everyone involved with safety and have a tally in a common area of how many days without an accident. Every 60 days with no accident everyone is rewarded.

97. Play music in the office.

98. Host meetings outdoors for a change of scenery and fresh air.

99. Start a community puzzle for employees to work on during lunch.

100. Initiate a walking, running, or other type of exercise club.


Hopefully this list gives your organization several ideas for employee engagement activities. Providing opportunities for employees to be engaged creates a positive environment where employees can excel in their work.

Engaged employees can pay off in better business results, retention, and productivity if your organization is willing to create a great workplace environment and culture.

Interested in learning more about engagement surveys?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a brochure that overviews what is included in ERC's engagement surveys and our process for conducting and assessing.

View the Engagement Brochure

 

5 Reasons Why Your Employees Aren't Fully Engaged

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Employee engagement is an employee's involvement with, commitment to, and satisfaction with their work. It is an employee's positive or negative emotional attachment and connection to their job, their coworkers, and their organization. Employees who are the most engaged...

  • love what they do
  • take pride in their organization
  • believe they can make an impact
  • work in the best interests of their organization
  • feel empowered to help move their organization forward
  • initiate new contributions to the organization

But every day, you probably encounter employees who are not fully engaged in their job or your organization. These employees lack full commitment, do not take as much initiative to go above and beyond their job responsibilities, show apathy and passivity, take on fewer projects, participate less, take less pride in the organization, and are not as enthusiastic about their work as they could be.
Read this article...

Employee Engagement Definition: What it Is, What Affects It, Where Employers Lag

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Understanding the employee engagement definition is on every employer’s priority list these days. The number of companies that want to measure, track, and improve employee engagement in their workplace continues to increase – a testament to engagement’s increasing popularity.

Understanding the concept of employee engagement can be confusing for many employers since so many conflicting definitions and research exists on the topic. This article seeks to clarify what employee engagement is, what affects it, and where employers typically lag in engaging employees.

What is employee engagement?

Employee engagement refers to an employee’s involvement in, commitment to, and satisfaction with their work. Many people mistake employee engagement for simply employee satisfaction. Engagement measures more than just an employee opinion of how satisfied they are at work. Rather, engagement measures how emotionally connected the employee is to their work.
Read this article...