Bri Izzo: #BelieveinHR Highlight Series

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ERC’s #BelieveinHR campaign is designed to empower and show appreciation to the HR community. As part of this campaign, ERC is producing a video series that focuses on highlighting professionals, both HR and not, thoughts on the importance of Human Resources.
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We Believe in HR

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As Northeast Ohio’s most trusted HR resource for nearly 100 years, ERC truly believes in HR and the importance of strong HR leadership. ERC proudly services the HR community with the answers and tools they need to make their jobs easier and their organizations better. We have seen time and time again the difference and influence HR professionals have on creating great workplaces. And that’s why we have created the “We Believe in HR” campaign. 
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New Recognition Program for Northeast Ohio HR Professionals

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ERC is very pleased to announce a new recognition program for Northeast Ohio HR professionals in 2013 – The HR Awards. This program is a joint collaboration between ERC and the Cleveland Society for Human Resource Management (CSHRM). The HR Awards recognize Northeast Ohio HR professionals who have demonstrated excellence in the field of human resource management. The awards honor all levels of HR practitioners, from individuals in local SHRM student chapters to HR executives.

Recognition is provided to HR professionals in the following areas:

  • Benefits
  • Global HR
  • Business Leadership
  • Organizational & Employee Development
  • Compensation
  • Talent Management
  • Diversity
  • Technology
  • Emerging Leader
  • Student Chapter of the Year
  • Employee Relations
  • Student Advisor of the Year

Winners are recognized at a special awards luncheon hosted by ERC and CSHRM. There is no cost to nominate an individual and nominations are made at www.TheHRAwards.com. Please note that self nominations are accepted and encouraged.

The HR Awards are sponsored by Smart Business, Cleveland.com, Hylant Group, Right Management, Staffing Solutions Enterprises and Ultimate Software. The program is also endorsed and supported by Greater Lorain County SHRM, Lake/Geauga SHRM and Medina County SHRM.

10 Qualities of Remarkable HR Leaders

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Remarkable HR leaders can emerge at any level. Whether they are an entry-level recruiter with a strong ability to hire unique talent, a tenured training manager who has a knack for building employees' skill sets, or a mid-level employee relations specialist with a unique skill for enhancing employee engagement, remarkable HR leaders impact their workplaces in positive ways.

Every day we witness HR leaders who find great talent in the midst of a skill-set shortage; devise competitive pay strategies to retain their top performers; coach managers to build their leadership effectiveness; create training and development programs that engage and grow their talent; design recognition programs that motivate employees; and so much more.

When we routinely interview HR leaders in the community, we find that many highly effective and respected HR leaders and professionals share certain characteristics. Here are 10 of those qualities.

  1. Caring. Remarkable HR leaders have integrity and instinctively care about people. They always put the needs and interests of their employees first. Their caring nature and emotional intelligence guide smart but compassionate policy making, and establish positive and healthy employee relations.
  2. Forward-thinking. They plan for the future of their workplaces, identifying potential threats and opportunities for attracting and retaining their top talent, as well as ways to make positive changes to their organization's culture. They ensure that they are prepared for challenges to protect their organizations and stay ahead of the curve.
  3. Passionate. Great HR leaders love and are passionate about what they do, where they work, their industry and most importantly about talent - finding it, empowering it, engaging it, and developing it. They truly enjoy what they do, whether it's specializing in a certain area of HR, being a generalist, or managing the function.
  4. Innovative. Remarkable HR leaders design creative approaches to attracting, managing, and developing talent with the understanding that to be competitive, they have to stand out from other employers and use different approaches. They are supporters, promoters, and designers of unique world-class talent initiatives.
  5. Strategic. They don't operate in a vacuum. Instead, outstanding HR leaders understand their organization's strategy, take an interest in its vision, and align their work, projects, and goals with the needs of their business. They know what high performance means and how to elicit it through talent management.
  6. Problem-solver. Remarkable HR leaders are problem solvers and impeccable crisis managers. HR lends itself to a number of unforeseen and complex legal, employee, and management problems. Great HR leaders help prevent those, deal with them, and significantly mitigate adverse effects on the organization.
  7. Communicator. Highly effective HR leaders are strong communicators and influencers. They are able to provide guidance on a range of HR issues and influence new ways of doing things to improve the organization's operations. They communicate with ease to employees and managers, and are also able to effectively facilitate change. They listen to their employees and build relationships with them over time.
  8. Ethical. Because they handle a great deal of confidential information and sensitive issues ranging from employee medical conditions and performance problems to legal matters, great HR leaders are trusted, ethical compasses of their organizations. They don't just do what's standard or required by law - they do what's right for their people - even if a higher cost or greater time investment is attached.
  9. Technology-minded. Great HR leaders vet, leverage, and use new technology to make their departments more efficient and accurate in their day-to-day operations. They aren't afraid to embark on new technology to improve their systems and processes.
  10. Life-long learner. Last, but certainly not least, extraordinary HR leaders never stop learning and networking to build their skill-sets and leadership as well as to gain new ideas. They are always trying to find ways to improve their own effectiveness, and thereby, their organization's success.

These are just some of the many qualities that can make an HR leader successful, but the bottom line is that remarkable HR leaders deliver exceptional achievements and results to their organizations by balancing the needs and interests of employees and the business.

Leadership Development Training Courses

Leadership Development Training Courses

ERC offers a variety of leadership development training programs at all levels of the organization.

Train Your Employees

7 Ways to Use HR Metrics

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Using HR metrics and data can be a useful strategy to uncover areas of opportunity and improvement, establish yourself or department as a strategic partner, and demonstrate your case when recommending new courses of action or programs. Here are 7 ways to effectively use HR metrics in your organization.

1. Have the right data…at the right time.

It’s important to track information and be able to present data and metrics. You never know when this data will be needed by you or your management team, so track well and often. Any analyst will speak from experience that being prepared with the numbers people are looking for is the key to success. You may not need to calculate or showcase them regularly, but have the information readily available so that you can tabulate the metrics when they need to be presented. Have the right data and the right time, and you’ll be hero in your business.

2. Select the most meaningful metrics.

There are plenty of metrics to consider, but not all of them are created equal. For example, consider turnover, which many HR professionals rely on to tell the whole story of their workplace’s effectiveness. Turnover can be measured in a number of ways – new hire turnover, voluntary turnover, and involuntary turnover, among others; but for some organizations, turnover isn’t a meaningful metric.  Sometimes it’s too non-specific. Additionally, it may not affect the bottom line or business objectives. A good rule of thumb when selecting metrics is to: Track what is valued. Track what is actionable. Track what best tells the story of what’s happening in the workplace.

3. Remember to measure the intangibles.

You may think that many aspects of HR can’t be measured because of all of the intangible aspects of the workplace, such as quality of relationships between employees and their supervisors, engagement or commitment, culture, or even trust in leaders. It’s important to keep in mind that there are many “softer” aspects of the business that can be measured accurately through a variety of means, including observation, surveys, and assessments. Sometimes these “intangibles” can also manifest themselves in objective data.

4. Speak the language of management.

Know what your management values. When presenting metrics data to back your decisions, speak the language of your managers and executives. If their focus is budget impact, industry comparisons, cash flow, sales, and/or revenue, be sure to convey how your data impacts all of these. With managers, specifically, make the information meaningful to their specific segment of the workforce.

5. Keep it simple, but insightful.

It’s rarely about how many numbers you have and how complex they are, but rather the impact of these and the insights you have gleaned from them. Make the information simple to understand and preferably visual, but useful and practical. Complement your numbers with concrete examples and try to always include a comparison – an external or internal benchmark – to help stakeholders understand what the numbers mean.

6. Connect the dots.

Connect the dots by explaining how your numbers and information relate. Explore relationships between data points and current workplace processes and programs (i.e. how a performance management process is linked to improved performance ratings, how training programs are linked to higher product quality, etc.) as managers and executives alike may not see the relationships between these. You must translate these relationships into actionable items, explaining how the data point can be impacted or improved.

7. Don’t assume you need an HRIS.

There’s no question that an HRIS can be a very useful tool for efficiently collecting metrics, but it’s not the only way and plenty of organizations use simple Excel spreadsheets to collect information. Don’t let not having an HRIS or other fancy dashboards and tools stop you from measuring important aspects of your business and workforce that will boost the effectiveness of your HR department.

There are countless HR metrics and data points, but more importantly than collecting these metrics is being able to use them effectively to help advance your career, department, and organization.

Additional Resources

If you’re looking for HR metrics as well as information and examples of HR best practices, check out our NorthCoast 99 Winner Reports, a comprehensive benchmark report that helps you compare your workplace against the top ones in the region and also provides employers with great ideas and information for how to improve their workplaces.

13th Annual Cleveland HR Star Conference

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It’s time to register for the 13th annual Cleveland HR Star Conference! The conference takes place on Wednesday, July 20th at the Cleveland Holiday Inn Independence.

This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Bob Nelson, author of the multi-million copy selling "1001 Ways to Reward Employees" as well as "Keeping Up in a Down Economy" and "Ubuntu!" among others. Dr. Nelson has appeared extensively in the national media including CBS 60 Minutes, CNN, CNBC, MSNBC, PBS and National Public Radio. In addition, he is a frequent expert resource for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week and Fortune.

For HR professionals from companies with 100 or more employees, this is still a FREE conference. It is only $98/person if your company has fewer than 100 employees, if your company is a potential exhibitor, or if 4 attendees from your organization have already registered.

ERC is proud to be the Promotional Sponsor for this year’s conference, and our very own Marty Mordarski and Katie Talarico will be presenting “Shoot for the Moon: How the NorthCoast 99 Winners Consistently Land and Keep Top Talent.”

For a complete list of topics and speakers, or to register, visit www.hrstarconference.com/cleveland/.  Sign up soon – last year’s conference was at capacity within 3 weeks!