Is Your Compensation Data Reliable?

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Is your Compensation Data Reliable?

Compensation data is an essential element in organizations' efforts to competitively recruit and retain top talent. This data is used to ensure market competitiveness in employment offers, and provides a foundation for complete compensation strategy reviews. Be careful about the data you use for compensation decisions. It should come from credible compensation surveys.
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5 Popular Methods for Interviewing Candidates

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5 Popular Methods for Interviewing Candidates

The traditional hiring process for an employer consists of roughly three stages: collect resumes, conduct an in-person interview, and then offer the job to the most qualified candidate. However, today can be a completely different story.

More employers are using digital methods or video capabilities as a way to reduce costs and speed up the time it takes to hire a new employee.

Employers and potential hires are increasingly able to schedule, record, and review interviews via smartphone apps.

So what are some of the different ways employers are finding candidates and conducting interviews?
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5 “High-Tech” Hiring Practices to Improve Your Talent Pool

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5 “High-Tech” Hiring Practices to Improve Your Talent Pool

1. Post a job opening on an online job board

Even if you don’t have a fancy applicant tracking system internally, almost all employers, 89% according to the 2013 ERC Hiring Practices Survey are putting their job postings up on some sort of external job board website. Most of these job boards are easy to navigate and should be a matter of simply inputting the information about the job opening and maybe a few pieces of information about your organization.

If the site allows applicants to fill out an online application or submit a resume through their site and funnel that onto you, make sure you review the process from an applicant’s standpoint as well. You don’t want to frustrate potential candidates with a process that your organization didn’t even create before they even get their resume into your email box!
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Recruiting with LinkedIn

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Recruiting with LinkedIn

In the summer of 2014, ERC hosted Kelly Royer of LinkedIn for an educational session on Recruiting with LinkedIn. Kelly shared some of her tips for finding talent on LinkedIn, as well as improving your individual and company presence.

50% Mobile. Did you know half of LinkedIn's activity comes from mobile devices?

Why use LinkedIn? Individuals use Linkedin to create an online identity, to network with other professionals, and to gain knowledge about their industry and their profession.

Passive Candidates. Most are not looking for jobs; in fact 75% of users are identified as "passive candidates", meaning they're not actively searching for jobs.
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How to Use LinkedIn to Recruit:10 Tips

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How-to-Use-LinkedIn-to-Recruit-10-Tips

The sphere of recruiting is changing rapidly and employers are increasingly relying on social networking websites to source talent, and finding that some of them are very effective. LinkedIn, in particular, has been cited by many employers as an extremely effective way of recruiting talent. According to our 2013 study of hiring practices, the majority of Northeast Ohio organizations surveyed (61%) use LinkedIn to recruit.

Although all social media platforms can be used for different purposes in the recruiting process, it's safe to say that LinkedIn is more professional and business focused, as well as more relevant to recruiting, as candidates can highlight their resume, skills, experience, connections, and general influence in the field. The platform is quickly becoming the choice for professionals to look for jobs and find employment - and for employers when sourcing talent.
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Social Recruiting: What's Trending Now

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Why is social recruiting such an important topic, and what's the value to your company? Mike Donoghue, the Senior Director of Mobile, Video & Vertical Strategy at Advance Digital (parent company of Cleveland.com), has teamed up with ERC to answer some of our most pressing social recruiting questions.

Trends & Growth

Over the last few years, Mike and his team have seen rapid growth happening on LinkedIn. As the 'brand-safe outlet', as Mike calls it, LinkedIn provides a platform for talent acquisition that does not require a deeper, personal relationship between company and candidate. Although, he also comments that as professionals become more weary of whom they add to their LinkedIn networks, there will be some decline in usage. Platforms like Google+, Twitter, and Facebook will gain popularity as organizations and individuals become more comfortable interacting and begin developing richer profiles.
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Business Related Social Media Use on the Rise

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Despite a strong focus over the years on the types of policies and restrictions being placed on employee’s social media use in the workplace, an equally important story regarding the growing use of social media among employer’s for business related purposes  is also emerging.

This change can be seen through a simple comparison of the results of ERC’s Social Media in the Workplace surveys over time. First conducted in 2010, employers indicated that the primary obstacle preventing their organization from actively engaging in social media use was “a lack of knowledge or expertise in using [social media] tools”, Facebook was ranked fourth among the most common social networking sites used by employers for a small list of business related purposes, and responsibilities related to social media fell to HR and Recruitment type positions.
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3 Steps Toward a Complete LinkedIn Profile

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Signing up for a LinkedIn Profile requires only a few simple pieces of information. However, the more complete your profile is, the more opportunities will likely open up for you.

According to LinkedIn, a "100% complete profile" includes the following items:

  • Industry and postal code
  • A current position with description
  • Two more positions
  • Education
  • At least 5 skills
  • Profile photo
  • At least 50 connections
  • A summary

In this article, we'll discuss 3 of these items that will be valuable additions toward a more complete profile.

Add at least three positions with descriptions

Likely one of the first things you'll do is add your current position. If you've gotten that far, you're off to a great start. But having a more complete employment history provide several benefits for you:

  • Connect with past co-workers - Adding employment history with past employers will allow you to reconnect with past co-workers, potentially opening the door for networking opportunities, partnerships with your current employer or simply reconnecting with an old friend.
  • Demonstrate experience - By adding multiple work experiences, you're demonstrating your experience with different employers in different positions with different job roles. You may also be able to show career progression as you move from one position to another.

Add previous education

Just as adding employment history gives you the ability to re-connect with past colleagues, adding education history allows you to reconnect with former classmates. It also shows relevant education as it pertains to your job or career.

  • Add relevant coursework - Be sure to add your concentration/major if you're adding a post-secondary education, but also include any relevant coursework to assemble a thorough education history.
  • Add activities and societies - This is another easy way to connect with people of similar backgrounds. You may find that you have a closer connection with some of your existing business relationships through past activities or societies.

Add a summary

A summary acts as your personal branding boilerplate. If you were in an elevator with your dream employer (which may be your current employer) and had to summarize your career, experience and expertise on the way up, what would you say? Luckily here, you have more than an elevator ride's amount of time to craft your summary.

  • Think in keywords - What are they keywords that you want people to associate you with? If you're a job seeker, you might use terms like "action-oriented" or "goals-driven." If you're looking to connect with other professionals in your industry, write in terms of tasks or responsibilities.
  • Share relevant extracurriculars - Are you affiliated with an industry association? Do you volunteer with a prominent group that may boost your credentials? Be sure to add that here.
  • Be concise - This isn't the place to write your life story. Try to use short sentences, bulleted lists and no more than a paragraph or two.

3 Reasons You Need to be on LinkedIn

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We've all been there. You're at a meeting or a networking event and you meet another professional. Within the next couple days you search for that person through Google or directly through LinkedIn to learn more about them and possibly even connect. And odds are if you don't do that, the other person does.

Social networks have become engrained in the fabric of contemporary networking, and LinkedIn is the network of choice for the business crowd. Having a LinkedIn profile is a necessity for every working professional. Here's why:

1. Control of Your "Personal Brand"

Businesspeople are expected to be on LinkedIn, and a lack of a profile can be an indication of an out-of-date or inaccessible professional. Your profile acts an extension of your business card, showcasing who you are, where you work and what your expertise is.

Quick tip: Don't use Facebook for business networking.*
*unless you feel 100% comfortable with your peers seeing that picture of you from the Bahamas two years ago

Here are three things you can do right away to make sure you're controlling your personal brand on LinkedIn:

  • Get a profile - This is a no-brainer. If you're not on LinkedIn, plan to set up a profile. LinkedIn offers several great tutorials on how to do this.
  • The basics - If you do nothing else, add your contact information and your current employer. This will drastically increase the ability for other people to find you on LinkedIn.
  • Keep adding - Once you've completed the basics:
    • add former employers (to connect with past colleagues)
    • add education (to connect with former classmates)
    • add a summary of your job and expertise (so people can learn more about you).

2. Organize Relationships

Increasing the size of your professional network, whether offline or online, should be an important component of any business professional's career. Having an extensive network comes in handy not only in career transition and advancement, but can be a great resource for sharing ideas and seeking support for issues related to your specific job function.

  • Staying in touch - Remember that person you met at the networking event mentioned above? Build that relationship by connecting with them on LinkedIn.
  • Staying current - LinkedIn provides you with constant updates about people you're connected to, including job transitions, promotions, shared content and more.
  • Staying in the loop - LinkedIn makes it incredibly easy to pose questions to your network and receive nearly instant feedback, making it a powerful tool for getting answers to your job-specific questions.

3. Finding Information & Answers

While LinkedIn is primarily a networking tool, it's become a great research tool for crowdsourcing ideas and information among similar groups of people. Here's how:

  • Your own audience - LinkedIn gives you the ability to ask your own audience a question and receive answers quickly, either through your status message or through a group discussion board.
  • The power of the Group - If you're not using Groups in LinkedIn, you're missing out on an opportunity to listen in on many of the discussions that your peers are having right now. Join a group or two to start, and simply read some of the discussion topics. You're bound to gain something insightful within the first week.