3 HR Processes You Need to Revamp in 2018

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3 HR Processes You Need to Revamp in 2018

Often HR processes become stagnant and untouched due to the “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it” mindset. Sometimes that works out perfectly fine, and well, sometimes it doesn’t. Dust off the old untouched processes and implement something new and refreshing. Your new hires and current employees will appreciate it.
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Keeping up with Background Screening

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Keeping up with Background Screening

As a Human Resources professional, it’s highly probable that your organization conducts pre-employment and/or employee background screening or is interested in doing so. According to a 2012 Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) report, 86 percent of companies conduct some type of criminal background check.

Many ERC members work with our Partner, Corporate Screening for their background needs. Matt Jaye, National Sales Manager at CS, shared some information about the background screening industry, how to select a provider, and how technology has affected the industry.

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3 Surprising Social Media Uses for HR

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3 Surprising Social Media Uses for HR

When we hear "social media" and "HR" in the same sentence, it's usually in a negative context. "How can we keep employees off of social media at work?" or "I saw something bad on a candidates social media profile, what do I do now?"

But social media can also be used creatively in several areas of the HR function. Consider the following uses for social media that you may not have considered:

Employee Communications

Communicating important inner-office or organizational updates to employees often falls upon HR departments. The standard mass email can be a great medium for getting a quick message out, but what if your communications requires more collaboration, input or feedback?
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Tips to Successfully On-Board Your New Hire

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A new job is an important decision in an employee's life and can elicit a number of emotions ranging from nervousness to excitement prior to the first day. HR can play an important role in capitalizing on these positive feelings and engaging new-hires throughout their first days. Here are some tips for successfully on-boarding your new-hire.

Make the pre-employment experience memorable.

Consider sending your new-hire a simple welcome package, calling them prior to their first day to welcome them, inviting them to a company event, and/or  sending a hand-written note or card. These unexpected, small gestures show that you are looking forward to working with the new-hire and reinforces their decision to come work for your organization. It also sends a positive message to their families.

Eliminate your probationary or introductory period.

Not only are these 90-day periods less common than they were several years ago, but there is no place for them in the workplace if you are confident that you have selected a great employee for the job. Requiring these periods in order for employees to continue employment and/or receive certain benefits tends to send the message that your new-hire "has to pass the test" to be a true employee of your organization and that you don't trust their potential. Is that the message you want to send to your new employee, and haven't they already passed the test if you made a good hiring decision?

Be prepared on day one.

Be ready for the new-hire when they arrive on their first day. Treat them like a guest by being ready at the front door, giving a guided tour, making introductions to staff members, providing lunch, and helping them at every step throughout the day. Ensure that their workspace is clean, stocked, and ready for work and that they have all the tools necessary to do the job, including proper equipment and computer programs. Make their first day as pleasant and as organized as possible and limit time spent on paperwork.

Cover the big picture.

Sometimes employers are so eager to get their new-hires working that they don't spend time educating them on the big picture, such as what the company does; it's history, mission, and vision for the future; its values and culture; its product and service offerings; industry; the markets and communities it serves; and the organization's structure. Spending time covering all of the core aspects of your organization's business is critical to helping the new-hire understand how their role fits into the organization.

Encourage relationship-building.

Provide time for your new-hire to build relationships with their supervisor and fellow team members by coordinating team events, social outings, one-on-one meetings, retreats, or other activities to help them learn about their fellow coworkers and build relationships with them. In addition, consider including your leadership team in the on-boarding process. Introducing new employees to senior management and allowing time to get to know them can build a sense of comfort, trust, and security in the leadership team.

Spend enough time on training and provide a mentor.

Surprisingly, many organizations don't spend enough time training their new-hires upfront, which can lead to a host of issues later. While you may want to get your new-hire started on tasks and projects, it's important to recognize that every new-hire (regardless of experience) will need training. Don't assume that they can just jump into the work with little direction or knowledge of your internal processes. If possible, also assign a "buddy" or mentor to help the employee learn and assimilate into the organization.

Ask for their feedback.

Throughout the first few months, it's important to establish checkpoints with your new-hire. If your organization doesn't have a formal feedback or survey process, ask new-hires a few simple questions - if the job is what they expected, what challenges they are experiencing, and if they are being provided with the right amount of training and support. Keep the lines of communication open with your new-hire to ensure that when a problem or misunderstanding arises, it is dealt with quickly.

On-boarding is about investing in employee retention, engagement, and productivity, so if you want to make sure your new-hire stays and thrives, consider these on-boarding practices. They are best practices from employers of choice in the region - NorthCoast 99 winners (www.northcoast99.org) - and will ensure that your new-hires are engaged and productive from the start.