Helping Employees Succeed: Managing Below-Average Performance

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Helping Employees Succeed: Managing Below Average Performance

Whether you work for a Fortune 500 company or a small mom-and-pop machine shop, chances are performance reviews aren’t very high up on the list of your employee’s favorite things to do at work. Whatever the shortfalls, perceived or real, of the performance management process at your organization, the angst around reviews is only magnified when working through the process with employees who receive less than stellar ratings.
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How to Re-Engage Employees Who Are Ready to Leave

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How to Re-Engage Employees Who Are Ready to Leave

Do you currently have an employee who has one foot out the door? There are endless reasons for voluntary turnover, and data from 2018’s NorthCoast 99 Top Performer Survey specifically identifies four of the most commonly cited sources of disengagement.

Employees are likely to chase after new advancement opportunities and more competitive compensation, while fleeing from a lack of flexibility and a lack of organizational support.

Once employees become disengaged, it can be a struggle to change their minds in a way that makes them want to stay.

Consider the following 4 ideas to re-engage those employees who could be on their way out.

1. Keep Lines of Communication Open

If regular employee-manager conversations don’t occur, you might find yourself quite surprised when you hear a top performer express intentions of leaving the company. Listen to all concerns intently and take them seriously. Consider preventive measures such as conducting regular “stay” interviews or employee engagement pulse surveys. Keeping your employees engaged requires continuous communication.

By maintaining an awareness of how your people are doing and how they feel about their work and roles in the organization, there will be more time and opportunity to engage your talent base.

It could be easier to remedy employee issues as they come to surface, rather than continuously cycling through the talent attraction and hiring process as a result of turnover.

2. Get Them “Un-stuck”

Give disengaged employees somewhere to go within the company. When you give them the opportunity to re-engage they feel less inclined to take their talent and knowledge elsewhere. Advancement opportunities allow top performers to feel continuously challenged and in charge of their learning, which not only serves to fulfill their needs for growth, but also benefits an organization’s competitive advantage (Deloitte).

Take note of the knowledge, skills, and unique attributes your organizational talent pool consists of, and figure out how you can better utilize your employees’ capabilities.

When they feel ready to move on to an external opportunity, offer to move these individuals into a new set of responsibilities in which they can flourish. And when you add new work to their plate, make sure their compensation is adjusted accordingly.  Having a talent-management system in place can facilitate this process. (Ultimate Software is an ERC Preferred Partner offering succession planning and talent development services.)

3. Recognize and Reward

A number of employees could be on their way out because they feel unappreciated for their efforts, and are no longer motivated to work for an organization that doesn’t recognize their contributions.

While no employee is likely to turn down a bonus for a job-well-done, money alone is not an effective long-term motivator (Harvard Business Review).

Showing appreciation can take on many forms, such as giving public recognition during staff meetings or interoffice email, awarding extra paid time off, or giving employees the chance to work on challenging projects that provide more work autonomy.

4. Support Work-Life Balance

If organizational policy is rigid and forces individuals to choose between work and family, employees will likely recognize that they have options that will better suit their needs (that don’t include their current employer).

Granting employees more robust benefits such as flexible work schedules, generous parental leave, telecommuting opportunities, and unlimited bereavement leave, is a way to communicate to employees that you recognize they are holistic humans and not productivity machines.

Don’t lose your best people to the competition by hanging on to traditional workplace practices that hold them back from living an enjoyable life.

In the end, if you feel unwilling to put in the effort required to re-engage departing employees, consider whether you can truly afford to lose this talent and adjust accordingly.

 

Interested in learning more about engagement surveys?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a brochure that overviews what is included in ERC's engagement surveys and our process for conducting and assessing.

View the Engagement Brochure

 

Artificial Intelligence: The HR Professional’s New HR Tech Obsession

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Artificial Intelligence: The HR Professional’s New HR Tech Obsession

At this point, you may already be familiar with popular virtual assistant technologies such as Siri or Alexa. These Artificially Intelligent (AI) virtual assistants can do an array of tasks in an instant. Checking the weather, playing music, finding directions, and reading the news are all tasks that can be done simply by prompting the tabletop device in your home. Which brings the question, if these devices can help people every day in their homes, what are the ways they can bring AI into their workplace?
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Defining and Measuring Employee Engagement

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Defining and Measuring Employee Engagement

Employee engagement is generally defined as a positive, fulfilled state of the employee regarding their work and their organization. Employee engagement is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption in work-related activities. Unsurprisingly, employee engagement connects with many desirable outcomes, including high performance, overall positive attitudes, better mental health, and increased innovation. If employees are not engaged, they tend to burn out and disconnect from their work.
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Are Managers Motivated to Give Accurate Performance Ratings?

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Are Managers Motivated to Give Accurate Performance Ratings?

Research has highlighted three key non-performance factors that can distort the performance ratings managers give to their employees.1 While rating subordinates, managers consider the negative consequences that can occur when providing accurate ratings, the organizational norms surrounding how they are supposed to rate, and the potential of fulfilling self-interests. These three factors add to the complexity of how managers are motivated to rate, and they lend support to the idea that managers are not always motivated to rate their subordinates accurately.
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The 3 Ps to an Employee Engagement Communication Strategy

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The 3 Ps to an Employee Engagement Communication Strategy

It’s no surprise to anyone in Human Resources that high engagement leads to increased retention, productivity, and business success. Assessing the level of engagement or commitment your employees have to your organization through Employee Engagement Surveys is only half the battle. The other, more crucial, half of the battle is how you communicate Employee Engagement Surveys and the results to your employees.
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