Task Management Tips & Tricks For The Insanely Busy HR Professional

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Task Management Tips and Tricks For The Insanely Busy HR Professional

Do you not have enough time in your day? Well, you are not alone! Many HR professionals find themselves attempting to balance between the day-to-day, the interrupting figurative fires that need putting out, and the strategic organizational goals; sometimes even taking work home with them just to keep up.

It can be extremely hard for HR professionals manage time and to-do list. It is important to understand that the proper time and priority management skills can boost productivity and efficiency. Fortunately, there is no shortage of options when it comes to techniques and tips.
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2017 Vacation Planner

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Vacation planners can make an employer’s vacation request and approval process a lot easier and more efficient. We've put together a free Vacation Planner for 2017 that you can download below.

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The Do’s and Dont's of Benchmarking and Performance Reviews

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The Do’s and Dont's of Benchmarking and Performance Reviews

In today's team and collaborative environment, having a performance review with employees is a great communication and evaluation tool. A survey conducted by SHRM in fall of 2012 shows that 74% of companies perform reviews annually, while 21% conduct reviews semi-annually. A small percentage performs them quarterly or ongoing.  

However, with most companies conducting some type of performance review, still 4 out of 5 U.S. workers are dissatisfied with their job performance review, according to a 2009 Reuters poll. So how can you conduct a review that will be beneficial, to both you and the employee?

We spoke with Tom Ault, Director of Technical Training at ERC, about how to use benchmarking to not only improve your organization’s measurement of the quality of policies, products, programs, and strategies, but how to make the employee more happy and comfortable with the process.
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Yelling at Co-Workers and Employees: Is It Ok?

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employee conduct in the workplace Yelling at Co-Workers and Employees: Is It Ok?

Yelling; it’s a part of human communication. Sometimes it’s good and sometimes not. People yell for many different reasons. Maybe it’s to assert themselves over others, or to make their presence known. Maybe they want to incite confrontation or satisfy an ego.

However, what if this is a common practice at your workplace? With any organization, employees at all levels of the business are expected to treat each other with respect. The success of your business heavily depends on co-operation and teamwork among all employees. It’s all about workplace civility.
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I Used to Be Their Friend, Now I'm Their Boss

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Friendships in the workplace aren’t bad (in fact, they can be very positive), but young workers have a tendency to view their coworkers as friends more than other employees. When friends start getting promoted and managing one another, these relationships can pose problems.

How to identify the ‘friend’

This is a leader that is congenial, well-liked, and has above average soft-skills. They are extremely supportive of their employees and approach management interactions more like coworker relationships.

This individual refrains from having tough or crucial conversations with their employees and fails to acknowledge or manage conflict, frequently avoiding it altogether.

They often don’t manage performance well, and put up with poor results to maintain a positive relationship.

In essence, they focus on being their employees’ friend, rather than their manager or leader. In fact, some of these leaders may be managing previous coworkers or friends of theirs. They may even engage in behaviors that are considered unprofessional for a leader, such as participating in informal social activities, becoming Facebook friends with their subordinates, or gossiping about other employees.

How to develop

This individual doesn’t necessarily need training in soft skills, but does need training on core management principles, such as performance management, feedback, and conflict management.

These will be uncomfortable topics for this individual that you may need to address multiple times. They may also need to be coached on how to balance creating supportive relationships and interactions with their employees with results and getting the job done.

Some will also need to better understand the role of the leader and how to act professionally with their employees.

Supervisory Training

A lot of the time, an employee who has recently been promoted to a supervisor role doesn't always have the resources available to them to be a successful leader. By sending your employee through a supervisor training series, it will teach them the fundamental topics that any manager would need in order to lead in the most effective manner.

In the end, it will not only benefit the employee, but also the company to have a well-skilled supervisor helping operate the organization.

Interested in learning more about training your supervisors?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a video highlighting our process and a brochure featuring our courses, delivery methods, and success stories.

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Training Your Interns: An Investment in Your Company’s Future

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Training Your Interns: An Investment in Your Company’s Future

Providing employees with opportunities for training and development is typically framed in terms of a long term investment by the employer. You, the employer, invest time and resources into developing an employee’s skill set and in turn they become a more valuable contributor. Ideally, this employee feels appreciated and valued enough to stick around and make your investment worthwhile.

So why, according to the 2014 Intern & Recent Grad Survey, do almost half (44%) of the Northeast Ohio organizations that participated provide one or more formalized training opportunities to their interns? Plus, as it turns out, the training and development of interns doesn’t stop with formal training programs, but also includes a wide variety of valuable development tools that can be applied to any employee.
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