Workers Compensation Best Practices for Employers

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Workers Compensation Best Practices for Employers

By utilizing workers’ compensation best practices employers can achieve a higher level of control over their workplace injuries, which can result in reduced severity and claim costs and better outcomes.

Early Reporting & Transitional Work

Early claim reporting is a crucial first step in controlling costs.  Numerous national studies have shown the longer it takes for a claim to reported, the costlier the claim.  That’s why it’s important to work with an Ohio Managed Care Organization (MCO) that has efficient options for reporting new workers’ compensation claims.  These can include fax, telephone, online or email reporting.
Read this article...

2014 HR Compliance Guide

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

2014 HR Compliance Guide

We’ve developed an easy guide summarizing what your organization needs to know to stay compliant as it begins the New Year. The guide includes a summary of several regulations that take effect as well as important legal issues on the horizon.

Regulations that Take Effect

Below are several major regulations and initiatives will take effect January of 2014.
Read this article...

2014 HR Compliance Timeline

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

2014 HR Compliance Timeline

This 2014 HR Compliance Timeline is meant to be a helpful tool in identifying and remembering important dates for HR professionals. You can also download a printable PDF version of this compliance timeline.

Due Date Compliance Requirement
January 1, 2014 Ohio Minimum Wage change takes effect
January 1, 2014 New defined benefit/contribution plan limits take effect
January 1, 2014 Revised limits on health savings accounts (HSA) take effect
January 1, 2014 FSA rule dropping “use it or lose it” requirement takes effect
January 1, 2014 Health plan design requirements take effect under the Affordable Care Act (ACA)
January 1, 2014 Rules regarding outcome-based wellness program incentives under the ACA take effect
January 1, 2014 Rules for applying annual limits and preventative care to defined contribution health care plans take effect
January 1, 2014 Individual health insurance mandate takes effect under the ACA
January 31, 2014 W-2s need to be issued to employees by this date; W-2s need to include cost of employer-sponsored group health care coverage
January 31, 2014 Form 940 due and Federal Unemployment Tax Rate (FUTA) needs to be deposited if owed
February 1, 2014 OSHA 300 Log (Forms 300 & 300A) needs to be posted on February 1st through April 30th
February 10, 2014 Form 940 due if FUTA deposits have been made on time
February 15, 2014 W-4 changes must be made for employees claiming no exemptions last year
July 31, 2014 Form 5500 due for calendar year defined contribution and benefit plans; Form 5500 due by the last day of the 7th month following end of the plan year for non-calendar year plans
September 30, 2014 EE0-1 reporting deadline
VETS-100/100A Form filing deadline
Deadline for distributing Summary Annual Report (SAR) to participants of defined contribution plans
December 1, 2014 Deadline for sending annual 401(k) and (m) safe harbor notice

Note: This chart is subject to change and more filing deadlines may apply for your specific organization than those listed in the chart.

Get more articles like this one delivered to your inbox.

Join the thousands who receive ERC's weekly newsletter to stay current on topics including HR news, training your employees, building a great workplace, and more.

Subscribe Now

Employment Laws HR Professionals Should Know

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

human resource laws human resources laws 24 Employment Laws HR Professionals Should Know

In order for an organization to avoid costly legal fines and other penalties, compliance with employment laws is essential. Below are the employment laws that every HR professional should know.

1. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act is administered by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and covers an employer who has fifteen (15) or more employees and prohibits discrimination against any individual on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.
Read this article...

Common E-Verify and I-9 Mistakes

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

e verify i9 Common E-Verify and I-9 Mistakes

The I-9 and E-Verify are used to help employers in determining an employee’s eligibility to work in the U.S. A number of errors and mistakes can occur with E-Verify and the I-9 form that employers should avoid in order to stay compliant. Here is a summary of some common mistakes employers make with the I-9 form and E-Verify.

I-9 Mistakes

Using an outdated I-9 form.

Be sure that your organization isn’t using the old version of the I-9 form. After May 7, 2013, all employers were required to use the most current version of the I-9 with new hires.
Read this article...

15 Employee Termination Tips for Firing Compliantly

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

15 Employee Termination Tips for Firing Compliantly

Firing an employee is one of the most unpleasant tasks you face, not to mention legally risky, and should be navigated with much caution, preparation, and deliberation. Here are 15 tips for effective, compliant, and professional terminations.

1. Terminate in-person

Always conduct the termination meeting in person and have the decision-maker and another management official present in the meeting as a witness. The decision-maker regarding the termination is usually a manager or executive in the organization.
Read this article...

An Overview of Workers' Compensation

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

While most employers take numerous steps to keep the workplace safe and healthy, injuries and accidents happen occasionally. Workers' compensation provides pay and benefits for workers injured while working, and also saves employers' liability and medical expenses. 

Workers' Compensation Defined

Workers' compensation is insurance that replaces an employees' compensation and medical benefits when they become injured on the job.
Read this article...

7 Tips for Workers’ Compensation Claims

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Workers’ compensation claims can be costly to an organization, especially if they aren't managed well. Here are seven (7) tips for employers in managing workers’ compensation claims cost-efficiently and correctly.

1. Promptly report all claims to the insurer.

Effective case management begins with timely reporting of your workers' compensation claim. The more quickly an injured employee reports a claim, generally, the more smooth the claims process. When claims are reported in a timely manner, evidence can be preserved and the claim can be better resolved; workers can start treatment sooner; fraudulent claims can be identified more quickly; and you can avoid potential monetary fines/penalties for failing to report claims.
Read this article...

When ADA & FMLA and Workers Comp Intersect

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

When ADA & FMLA and Workers Comp Intersect

Workers' compensation laws, the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are not mutually exclusive - they all can intersect. According to CareWorks, ERC's Preferred Partner, one of the most common mistakes employers make is failing to run workers' compensation and FMLA concurrently.

Importance of Understanding the Intersection

Each of these laws serves a different purpose. Workers' compensation compensates employees who cannot work based on a work-related injury, ADA protects and aids individuals with a disability, and FMLA provides job protected leave to individuals with a serious medical condition. But, by qualifying under one law, an employee is not automatically disqualified from the others. If more than one law applies to the situation, then the injured worker must be afforded all the rights under each applicable law.
Read this article...

4 Things to Know About E-Verify

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 forbids employers from "knowingly hiring illegal workers." Employers must comply with this law by verifying the eligibility of prospective employees to work in the U.S by gathering information on the I-9 form. One way to do this is by using E-Verify, an electronic way of verifying employment eligibility based on U.S. requirements.

What is E-Verify?

E-Verify is a free online system operated by the federal government which allows an employer to determine the eligibility of an employee to work in the United States by comparing information reported on an employee's I-9 form to data from U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Social Security Administration records.
Read this article...