7 Strategies to Find Extraordinary Local Talent

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Is your organization looking for extraordinary talent and thinks it needs to search outside of your local community? Not so fast. Many employers think they can't find talent locally and pursue their search elsewhere, but local talent is at your fingertips if you use the right strategies.

Using local job boards, postings, and advertisements (either print or online) is a good start.  These days, however, employers need to go a few steps further to find the very best talent, including building strong local roots.

Here are some proven strategies used by other local employers to consider in your quest to find and hire exceptional local talent.

  1. Pay attention to and learn about local talent in the region. Read local publications and news. Learn about the successes of other companies and the individuals employed at those organizations.  Take notice of individuals gaining attention in the local media, those receiving industry recognition and awards, and those that contribute the community in their field of expertise.
  2. Develop a presence on social media. Join local groups on LinkedIn, follow local talent on Twitter, read their blogs, and/or create a Facebook page. There are so many ways to leverage these platforms to find talent. For instance, monitor key influencers and those people contributing quality questions and content.
  3. Participate in the community. Get involved in local chambers of commerce. Go to conference and community events held around your community. Join local chapters of professional associations.  Seek and attend speaking engagements. Do community service, participate on boards, and help our non-profits. Use local resources for leadership and employee development. Meet a diverse group of people, network, and learn who the key players are in your community.
  4. Connect with local colleges, universities, and vocational schools. Develop strong relationships with professors and career centers at those institutions. Pursue speaking engagements at colleges so that students are exposed to your company and its leaders.  Use alumni relations to stay in touch. Create internships and entry-level opportunities to keep young talent here for the future of the region.
  5. Encourage your employees to be active in their communities and engage in local professional groups for their personal development. They'll engage and network with others and potentially refer them to your organization for employment. Plus, they'll likely gain valuable professional skills in the process.
  6. Partner with local talent search providers and staffing organizations. There are plenty of them with unique expertise. Plus, they often have the best knowledge of the local labor market and how your organization can find great local people. Who better to trust in finding a local hire than a local staffing provider?
  7. Boost your local workplace intelligence. Know what other local employers are paying for certain talent and jobs. Understand the kinds of benefits and perks they offer to employees. Explore ways that other local organizations are creating attractive and engaging workplaces that keep great talent.

Finding local talent isn't easy, but if your organization is committed to hiring good people, it's worth the effort. Next time your organization is considering looking outside of Northeast Ohio for a great hire and thinks that certain talent doesn't exist in our region, try these strategies before taking your search elsewhere.

Additional Resources

NorthCoast 99
Get recognized as a great place to work in 2012 to help your organization better attract and retain top talent in Northeast Ohio by participating in our NorthCoast 99 program. Click here for more information.

Staffing Services
ERC partners with several local organizations dedicated to staffing, recruiting, and hiring talent. Our Preferred Partners provide various staffing services to ERC members at discount rates. Learn more

Survey Information
Use ERC's compensation, benefits, and policy/practice information to determine the pay, benefits, and practices other local employers use to attract and retain great talent. Click here for more information about our surveys.

Why You Can't Find the Right Hire

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Many employers are facing what is perceived to be a “talent shortage” – many applicants, but few qualified candidates. Even though this perceived talent shortage may be real, here are some other reasons why your organization may not be able to find the right hire.

You have too many job requirements.

Making your qualification requirements too detailed and specific can narrow your applicant pool and doesn’t necessarily ensure that you’ll hire a top performer. Many employers make the mistake of assuming that more experience, education, and specific skills mean a better performer, but fit and personality factors should also play a role. Requesting too many requirements could eliminate candidates that can do the job well and have growth potential. A classic example of individuals affected by narrow job requirements are recent college graduates, who may not necessarily have the skills or experience you are requiring, but may be top performers.

You have misconceptions about unemployed, disabled, and older workers.

Consider whether your organization is inadvertently discriminating against the unemployed, disabled, older workers by acting on misconceptions that these types of individuals are worse performers or less-than-ideal employees. Being unemployed, disabled, or older should not automatically eliminate applicants from being considered for employment. Not only will these misconceptions limit your applicant pool and cause you to miss a potential great hire, but they could eventually lead you to court. Plus, there are a number of successful companies that have tapped into these applicant pools and found top-quality hires.

Your sourcing is too limited.

If your organization is relying solely on job board postings to acquire talent, its sourcing strategy is probably too narrow and thereby ineffective. While job boards are still a common source used by employers to source talent, organizations need to tap both active and passive job candidates – those that are actively seeking new employment and those that are open to new job opportunities but aren’t actively searching. Many employers have turned to social media, networking, and “niche” recruiting to attract specialized talent and tap into these passive candidates.

You aren’t using your network.

A network is, by far, the best way to attract quality hires. Tap into your entire organizational network – including employees, customers, professional connections and relationships – for their recommendations on potential candidates.  They are usually thrilled to help and provide meaningful suggestions. Plus, referrals are one of the most effective ways to attract quality hires and are one of the least expensive sourcing strategies.

You aren’t willing to train and develop the skills you need.

It’s much easier to find an individual that has the ability and desire to learn then it is to find an employee with every skill you need, especially for hard-to-fill technical positions. Consider whether your organization is open to training and developing some of the skills you need but can't find. This option may save you significant time and recruiting costs and allows you to focus on less trainable attributes like culture fit during the hiring process.

Your candidate experience could improve.

Once you’ve found a qualified candidate, how does your organization treat and follow-up with them throughout the hiring process? Chances are, your responsiveness, flexibility, and communication with potential job candidates could improve. Remember that job candidates are just like customers and employees. They’re evaluating your organization and will tell others about their experiences. Make sure those experiences are positive.

You may not be setting your organization apart from the rest.

Finally, has your organization revealed to its applicants how it is it different from other companies? Perhaps it offers stability or advancement opportunities that other employers can’t provide. Maybe it is growing rapidly, has a unique family-friendly culture, or was recognized as a great place to work nationally or regionally. If you don’t talk about your strengths or promote why your organization is a great place to work, applicants won’t know what they are missing by not accepting a job at your organization. Gaining recognition as a great place to work, such as through the NorthCoast 99 program (www.northcoast99.org), and leveraging this to attract applicants, can boost your organization’s reputation and is often the best place to start when it comes to improving your ability to attract talent. It also shows that you care about being an employer of choice and strive to be a good workplace.

Talented employees are undoubtedly a sought-after commodity, but many employers have found that these strategies help them attract the very best talent. If your organization is facing its own “talent shortage,” keep these suggestions in mind.


For more information on how to earn recognition as a NorthCoast 99 winner and one of the best places to work in Northeast Ohio please visit www.northcoast99.org

10 Common Hiring Mistakes

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Hiring mistakes can drain your organization's resources, lead to poor hiring decisions, and distract managers from running business operations. Here are 10 mistakes your organization should be sure not to make so that it hires well. 

1. Not understanding the talent you need.

Knowing the skills, knowledge, abilities, and typical background of talent you are looking for helps you define the job and assess candidates according to the right criteria. It's also important to understand the innate traits and personalities associated with a good fit for a particular role. Spend time with your hiring managers and employees to understand the dynamics of the role and type of talent best suited to perform the job.

2. Insufficiently assessing all job functions.

Oftentimes a candidate is very strong on one key job function and this overshadows their weaknesses in others. If multiple job functions are critical, be sure that you are evaluating them comprehensively and not letting an overwhelming strength in one area lead to an inaccurate perception of the candidate's true breadth of capabilities.

3. Not checking references or pre-screening.

References are an ideal source of background information about a candidate, but are often skipped in the hiring process or used simply as employment verifications. Similarly, pre-screening can screen out individuals so that you don't need to invest resources in evaluating too many candidates. References and pre-screening can be helpful "eliminators" to screen out potential candidates and may provide insight into how employees performed in past jobs.

4. Not training your interviewer.

Many individuals with hiring responsibilities - namely hiring managers - have not been properly trained to interview. Not training interviewers can result in asking inappropriate and inconsistent questions or hiring based on subjective biases, first impressions, and a "gut feeling" instead of objective credentials. Creating hiring tools, such as pre-planned interview questions or guides, can also help.

5. Relying on the interview.

A single interview should not be your only assessment of the job candidate. Even the best interviewers are subject to biases and impressions. Having multiple interviews with several other employees and using pre-employment tests, references, and work samples can be helpful in evaluating a candidate for skill and culture fit. While it could be more time-consuming and costly, the more evaluators and types of evaluation you add into the selection decision, the more likely you are to make a better hiring decision which saves time and money in the long run.

6. Focusing too much on experience or education.

Focusing too heavily on experience and/or education can have its drawbacks. Experience and/or advanced degrees doesn't necessarily equate to top performance in a role and also aren't the only factors that can lead an employee to succeed. Frequently, these requirements can lead employers to disregard potential hires who may have less experience or education, but have shown results in their past roles.

7. Ignoring culture fit.

Unlike skills, you can't teach culture fit or change personality. Your organization should give significant consideration to a candidate's attitudes, style, behaviors, work ethic, and belief systems which impact their ability to be successful on the job and within your team. If you think the employee's style won't mesh well with their manager or team, this should be cause for concern.

8. Settling for less than the best.

Hiring too quickly (often from need or even desperation) can be a recipe for a poor hiring decision.  Additionally, if you only have a few candidates to pick from, be sure that you are truly hiring the right person and not just the best candidate from the few in which you had to choose. In both of these situations, you're frequently settling for a less than ideal candidate, which almost always leads to a bad hire.

9. Failing to consider satisfaction.

People typically only excel at tasks which capture their true passions and interests. How does the candidate talk about their past jobs? How do they react to the job duties discussed? What tasks have they not enjoyed in prior jobs? What are their long-term career goals? These are all helpful questions you can ask to gauge whether the candidate will be satisfied in the job.

10. Having unrealistic expectations.

Finally, it's not uncommon these days to see lengthy lists of qualification requirements in job ads. Not only can these requirements be unrealistic, but they also could be screening out potential hires. Be sure that these truly should be requirements for the job, or rather preferred qualifications, because the chances of you finding an employee that meets every one of your many requirements is usually not realistic.

Hiring mistakes will happen, but by making sure that you understand the talent you need, are evaluating candidates comprehensively, take into consideration job and culture fit, and don't inadvertently screen out potential top performers, you can greatly reduce the probability of a bad hire.

Additional Resources

Behavioral Interviewing
Asking the right questions and phrasing them the right way is integral to hiring the right person for the job. This workshop gives participants the skills they need to effectively plan for and conduct an effective behavioral-based interview. It also guides participants through effectively evaluating candidates so they can hire the best candidate.

HR University 

As part of HR University, a comprehensive course for those who are newer to the HR profession, one of the sessions (Staffing & Recruitment Practices) addresses time and money-saving ways of finding qualified candidates, steps to take once you have found a potential new employee, how to get your hiring managers to follow your plan, and how to link your hiring plans with your company's strategic goals.

Selection Assessments

ERC’s assessment services, which use online and credible instruments, help minimize the uncertainty in employee selection by evaluating the skills, abilities, style, and career goals of job candidates in relation to your job requirements. Our services also include professional interpretation and feedback from our Management Psychologist, Don Kitson.

Project Assistance
ERC offers a broad range of HR consulting services and has expertise in developing selection systems, recruiting, and developing job descriptions. For more information about these services, please contact consulting@ercnet.org.

ERC members save money with our Preferred Partner Network Click here for details (link to partner page).

Your Plans for Hiring Military Personnel

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There's a growing movement to help our nations veterans find work. ERC Preferred Partner CareerCurve is interested in your organization’s plans related to attracting returning military personnel to employment opportunities. 

They are conducting a survey, as a precursor to offering support to those employers seeking to align their hiring process to meet the unique needs of veterans looking for civilian employment. Your response would be appreciated.

Please use the link below to participate in this survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CareerCurveMilitaryHiringSurveyYT8JQKV

Competition for Top Talent Rises; Proactive Approach is Recommended

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While unemployment across the country might be high, employers around Northeast Ohio might be surprised to learn that isn’t necessarily the case locally.

For example, the city of Mentor reported an unemployment rate of 5.8 percent for September, according to an article published in November of 2011 in The News-Herald.

“There’s a perception out there that the unemployment rate is so high,” said SueAnn Naso, President of Staffing Solutions Enterprises in Mayfield Heights. “The federal rate is what everybody hears, but when you drill down into different pockets in Northeast Ohio, we’ve got a lot of people back to work, and our rates are much better.”

For employers across the region, a lower unemployment rate means a more competitive market for top talent. Employers looking to hire the right talent for their organizations can no longer afford to sit back and wait for talent to come to them, said Dan Barnett, owner of Integrity Staffing Services in Twinsburg.

“Companies should be very proactive in planning,” Barnett said. “Most companies are reactive when it comes to hiring. Being proactive, understanding the marketplace, knowing what you’re looking for - organizations should take a look at their hourly wages and salary structures, especially in the manufacturing and distribution level with minimum wage going up at the beginning of 2012. Companies need to start reconsidering pay levels, even if they’re above  minimum wage. Otherwise, they’ll miss the opportunity to attract the top talent in the marketplace.”

For employers looking to improve their recruiting efforts, local help is available from such firms as Staffing Solutions and Integrity Staffing, which together comprise the Northeast Ohio Talent Alliance (NEOTA). Staffing Solutions primarily works with organizations to fill positions in the administrative, office, accounting, professional, and human resources sectors, while Integrity’s focus is on manufacturing , distribution and light industrial.

“Recruiting can be a very time-intensive process,” Naso said. “Many companies don’t experience a steady or constant need for recruiting – it goes up and down. Companies tend to staff internally at a certain level, but they need help when they hit those spikes. That cyclicality creates a need to have a solution. Recruiting firms are constantly recruiting because there’s always somebody who has a need. 

“We’re constantly building a database, constantly adding to the pool. That gives organizations a resource to tap into when they have those peaks.”

A local manufacturer recently found itself in that exact position. Having just ended a hiring freeze, the company didn’t have dedicated recruiting support internally and was uncertain about the number of hires it would have in 2011.

“Our client brought Staffing Solutions in to manage all their permanent hiring as an outsourced solution,” Naso said. “We ended up filling more than twice as many positions as originally estimated in half the time it would have taken them to fill the positions on their own.

“They also decided to outsource the management of their temporary staffing to us because it was becoming increasingly more challenging for one agency to fill all their needs. We’re currently managing five agencies to ensure we’re bringing the quality talent needed to meet their fluctuating temporary needs.”

Staffing Solutions and Integrity Staffing are Preferred Partners of ERC. Click here for more information about our partners. 

Career Centers: Key Stop for Internship Seekers

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Results from the 2011 ERC/NOCHE Intern & Recent Grad Pay Rates & Practices Survey indicate that career center services at colleges/universities remain the top resource utilized by Northeast Ohio companies to advertise internship opportunities.

According to the survey, which is conducted annually by ERC in collaboration with the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education (NOCHE), since 2009, over 60% of organizations consistently prefer the use of career centers compared to other sources utilized.

Other sources cited as commonly used include campus outreach (ex. career fairs, advertising), building relationships with college/university professors, as well as alumni contacts within these colleges/universities. 
This suggests that not only do college/university students dominate the internship workforce, but that utilization of their career centers is key to obtaining the internships they seek.

Research done here at ERC shows that career centers provide many benefits for both the employer and the potential intern.  For the employer, at minimum, most career centers offer job boards or an internal website to post internship opportunities.  For students, there are often a myriad of other services their career center offers to both help in their internship search, and in solidifying a career choice.

View the Intern & Recent Graduate Pay Rates & Practices Survey

This survey reports data from Northeast Ohio employers about their internship and recent graduate employment and pay practices.

View the Results

5 Costly HR Mistakes

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These common HR mistakes have very costly consequences for many businesses. Find out the symptoms of these mistakes and their warning signs and how to avoid them.

1. The one-person HR department.

Symptoms: HR functions are managed by individuals with no HR experience such as an Operations Manager, Office Manager, or a Controller. HR responsibilities are delegated to line managers.

Results: When the HR function is managed by individuals with other responsibilities, or those that haven’t been properly trained in HR, important tasks tend to fall through the cracks – like meeting compliance deadlines and keeping up with changing legal requirements and trends. The basics may be accomplished, but more strategic issues are overlooked.

Solutions: Training anyone involved in an HR function or responsibility on the basics of HR, outsourcing HR projects (i.e. compensation, benefits analysis, performance management process overhaul, training and development), and using experienced consultants to help with strategic issues are ways to support the one-person HR department.

2. Losing control of hiring and recruiting.

Symptoms: Your organization receives an unmanageable number of resumes, has hiring managers that ask their own interview questions or use biases to make selection decisions, is frequently rushed to hire anyone to fill a position – which oftentimes is not the best hire, or lacks a consistent method of selection (different candidates are evaluated on different criteria). Or, your hiring process may be so lengthy and inefficient and require so many individuals’ involvement, that candidates lose interest and patience.

Results: Your organization experiences new-hire turnover, turned down job offers, vacant positions, lost productivity, and low hiring manager and new-hire satisfaction. You may experience difficulty managing applications and resumes and overlook potential top talent. You put your organization at legal risk because selection is not based on objective and consistent criteria. You rush the process and end up with a poor hire which affects your bottom line and that you inevitably terminate.

Solutions: Investing in an applicant tracking system, training hiring managers in the basics of interviewing and selection, and developing standard hiring policies and processes are all ways to make your hiring process more efficient, consistent, and productive. Also, establish reasonable timelines for the hiring process and only include those that need to be involved. Lastly, make sure that you believe the person you are hiring is the best candidate for the job and will be a top performer. Don’t just hire to fill a spot – it is far more costly in the long run.

3. Not reviewing performance.

Symptoms: In light of not providing pay increases the past few years, your organization may have skipped its annual performance review. Or, your performance review process may be lackadaisical – reviews aren’t completed on time and supervisors don’t take them seriously. Your organization may not even have a formal method of reviewing performance.

Results: In turn, either a portion of your workforce or many of your employees don’t receive feedback about their progress, leading to disengagement and less productivity. Documentation about performance is lacking, so when you need to terminate someone, you’re at a loss. Measurement of performance may be questionable, especially if supervisors don’t take the process seriously, and this could affect other programs like variable pay. Employees are dissatisfied with how their performance is measured and consider the tool invalid.

Solutions: Reviewing performance annually (at a minimum) is important. Develop either a standard review form or goal setting process, and consider employees’ feedback in the development of the system for buy-in. Additionally, train your supervisors in performance management (especially conducting a performance review) and hold them accountable for performance management duties in their own reviews. Make the performance management process mandatory, but not cumbersome (i.e. too many reviews to do at once, too lengthy form, etc.).

4. Failing to know your competitors.

Symptoms: Your organization doesn’t invest any time in learning about or benchmarking other organizations’ pay, benefits, or workplace practices. It doesn’t track HR data or metrics. It doesn’t know who its competitors are in terms of talent.

Results: Job candidates turn down offers or provide direct feedback that pay or benefits are below that of other organizations. Voluntary turnover of employees is prevalent in certain pockets of your workforce or throughout the organization. You receive consistent complaints about pay, benefits, and development opportunities.

Solutions: Identify the organizations in which you compete for similar types of talent and define their industry, size, and location. Select a few sources of data that are most relevant to these organizations. Compare your internal data with the information in these sources. Use the data to make adjustments to your pay, benefits, and workplace practices.

5. Not protecting your business.

Symptoms: Your employee handbook hasn’t been updated in a few years. Compliance changes have been neglected, as have risk management and disaster recovery plans. You haven’t created succession, development, and staffing plans to assure that you have the right talent in place to meet short and long term business objectives. You don’t look at demographic trends that will impact your business – like retirements or family needs.

Results: Your organization finds that it can’t make termination or disciplinary decisions without legal risk because it lacks certain policies. You realize that you don’t have the right skills or competencies to meet your organizational objectives. One of your key leaders leaves and you don’t have anyone prepared to fill the missing role. An employee goes out on FMLA and no one has been cross-trained to fill their shoes.

Solutions: Create succession plans for key roles and create plans (with timelines) to develop individuals in your organization to take on these roles, such as leadership development training or preparation. Conduct an annual “skills inventory” each year of your employees and compare the results to your strategic objectives. Do you have the skills you need? For what skills do you need to develop or hire? Do you have back-ups cross-trained? Coordinate training and staffing plans with this inventory. Finally, update your employee handbook at least annually (and always after a change in employment law) and obtain an outsider’s perspective – such as a consultant or legal counsel. These individuals will be able to notice gaps or deficiencies in your policies and make recommendations to protect your business.

Additional Resources

HR Consulting & Project Support
ERC is a leading provider of quality, affordable HR consulting and project support services in Ohio. Our HR consulting services provide the crucial strategic and technical expertise needed to support your HR goals and workplace initiatives. Contact consulting@yourerc.com for more information.

Compensation & Benefits Surveys
ERC publishes many compensation and benefits surveys to help Northeast Ohio employers benchmark their pay and benefits practices.Our ERC Salary Survey, Wage Survey, and Executive Compensation Survey provide local pay information for over 300 positions.

Internships Growing in Northeast Ohio

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According to the results of the 2011 ERC/NOCHE Intern & Recent Grad Pay Rates & Practices Survey, more Northeast Ohio organizations are planning to grow or maintain internship programs compared to those planning to reduce or eliminate their interns.

Results from the 2009-2010 surveys, conducted annually by ERC in collaboration with the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education (NOCHE), highlight a trend in the overall percentage of organizations that plan to increase their number of hired interns from 23% in 2009 to 35% in 2011.  In addition, survey results show a steady decline in the number of organizations who plan to reduce or eliminate their internship programs over the same period.

Organizations Planning to Make Modifications to Internship Programs

Results also show that an increased percentage of organizations find value in hiring interns to (among other cited reasons) develop a talent pipeline, assist with special project work, test potential employees before hiring them, obtain affordable workforce support, increase exposure at local colleges and universities, and to improve retention of new college graduates in Northeast Ohio.

View the Intern & Recent Graduate Pay Rates & Practices Survey

This survey reports data from Northeast Ohio employers about their internship and recent graduate employment and pay practices.

View the Results

3 Steps to a Great First Impression with New Hires

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Remember your first day at your job? Did you feel excited? Did you feel welcome? Did you feel like the organization was prepared for your arrival and happy you were there? Or, did you leave that day with a serious case of “buyer’s remorse” thinking you made a terrible decision? Here are three simple steps to make sure you make a great first impression with your new hires!

Talk to new hires before day one.

What happens after a job candidate accepts an offer of employment? Does anyone speak to that person again before his or her start date? If not, consider doing a few little things between the job offer and the new hire’s first day to reinforce that he or she made a great decision to come work for your organization. Send a note of congratulations, flowers, gifts, or logo items to the person’s home. Have the person’s supervisor or future co-workers reach out and offer a congratulations. Send a schedule for the new hire’s first day or even first few weeks of employment including a list of items and information they may need. Send paperwork that can be completed prior to the first day to make sure the new hire’s time is more productive starting on day one. Make that person feel like he or she just made one of the best decisions of their life.

Be ready on day one.

Have you ever showed up for your first day on a new job and you didn’t have a desk, a phone, business cards, pens or pencils, or any idea who you needed to meet with, for how long, or for what? If so, then you already know that the fastest way to make a person start second-guessing their decision to work for you is to make them feel invisible on day one! You should be ready for your new hires when they walk in the door. Plus, the better prepared you are, the faster you can get that new employee trained and actually contributing to your organization.

Talk to new hires after day one.

Check in at 30, 60, and/or 90 days. Conduct a “new-hire survey” to see if the experience of your new-hires during the recruiting process prepared them for your workplace culture and performance expectations. Ask for suggestions. Use the information you collect to help improve your recruiting processes, communications, and interviewer skills. Make your employees feel like they aren’t just special when they’re being recruited or on their first day – reinforce that they, and their opinions, are important from here on out.

You don’t get a second opportunity to make a great first impression, but when you’re proactive and well prepared for your new hires, you can create opportunities to make many great impressions throughout the recruiting, hiring, and orientation process.

Other Resources:

HR University: Orientation & Performance Management Practices
New employees at your organization need to understand their role, what’s expected of them, and how this fits into your business. Going forward, they’ll need feedback on how they’re doing, in order to reinforce positive behaviors and discourage negative ones. This session will cover the basic steps of a thorough orientation process, how HR can help supervisors manage their direct reports’ performance, and what to do when a performance management program needs adjusting.

Survey Shows Trends in Local Hiring Metrics

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The 2011 ERC Hiring & Selection Practices Survey shows several trends in hiring metrics such as time to fill, time to start, cost of hire, offer acceptance rates, and vacancy rates that help employers benchmark their hiring practices against other local organizations.

The survey’s results show that the average time to fill an open position is 52 days. Positions with the highest average time to fill were executive, engineering, and management positions, while positions with the lowest time to fill were production, maintenance, customer service, and administrative/clerical jobs.

Additionally, the 2011 survey reports that the average time to start is 14 days for employers. This timeframe was consistent across most employers. This reflects the average number of days between offer acceptance and the employee’s first day on the job. Lower vacancy rates were reported by employers of 11 days on average.

The 2011 survey’s results also indicate the average cost of hire for respondent, which is $2,233.