14 Tips to Drive Revenue in HR

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14 Tips to Drive Revenue in HR

HR may not always be able to directly contribute to the bottom line, but there are a number of impactful ways that it can help drive revenue. Here is a list of 14 things your HR department can do to drive revenue at your organization.

  1. Win over talent from your competitors. Win over the best talent with better compensation, benefits, opportunities, and a more attractive workplace.
  2. Retain your top producers. Figure out what will make top performers stay and create a strategy to keep them at your organization.
  3. Pay for performance. Create an incentive program directly tied to profitability. Whether that's a bonus program or profit sharing program, it should produce performance gains.
  4. Be selective. Be choosy with your benefits offerings. Select benefits that matter most to your top talent. You may administer 20 different benefits when just 5 are used and valued.
  5. Incorporate drivers of revenue into performance management. Understand the drivers of revenue in your organization and make sure those are measured in the performance evaluation process.
  6. Train smarter. Conduct a training needs assessment to prioritize and identify critical training needs across the organization. Use high quality training methods that lead to behavior change.
  7. Track ROI. Link wellness to health insurance usage; training to performance improvement; engagement to profitability gains. Showing ROI helps build a business case for HR and reinforces its value.
  8. Improve medical and leave management. Administering employee leave more efficiently and choosing an effective Managed Care Organization (MCO) are ways that you can help employees get back to work in less time and reduce the drain of medical leave and workers compensation costs.
  9. Measure what matters. Measure HR cost factors (i.e. compensation cost, benefits cost) and revenue per employee. Know what your top HR costs are and how those compare to other organizations.
  10. Implement time-saving systems. Digitize HR data and record retention. Make it easy for employees and managers to access and use the information you collect so that they can focus on producing results.
  11. Identify obstacles to revenue generation. Lead performance improvement efforts, suggestion and feedback programs, and other means to help identify opportunities to increase revenue.
  12. Plan your workforce. Understand your organization's areas of growth and ensure that you are stacking those areas with top talent. Workplace planning prioritizes hiring needs.
  13. Reduce legal fees. By choosing inexpensive legal resources and assistance, obtaining legal knowledge, and keeping your organization compliant, you can significantly reduce legal fees.
  14. Save on staffing. Hiring is arguably one of your most expensive HR areas. Reduce your cost per hire by taking advantage of staffing service discounts and using creative, inexpensive sourcing methods.

HR departments that drive revenue and results in their organizations take advantage of opportunities to save their organizations money wherever possible, identify opportunities to build up their top revenue producers, and simply manage HR smarter and more efficiently.

HR Project Support: Job Descriptions and Onsite HR Audit

Bandwidth Battles: Streaming Content Takes a Hit

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As the mid-afternoon lull sets in, you decide to check in with a few folks. When you poke your head in and say hello, you get no response. With their headphones in and Pandora buried beneath a cascade of windows on their desktop, you can see that this employee is clearly focused on the task at hand. You move on to the next cube over- headphones again. Oh well, you can stop by again tomorrow, besides there’s a new Pandora station you’ve been meaning to try.

But what if Pandora wasn’t an option anymore? What about YouTube, ESPN.com, or any other site containing streaming audio or video? Employees all across the country are finding out as more and more employers are unable to keep up these bandwidth hogs.

CNN cited Proctor & Gamble as yet another prominent example of an organization forced to make the decision to block certain sites with streaming content. For P&G employees, Pandora and Netflix are now a thing of the past, but interestingly, both YouTube and Facebook remain accessible.

Their decision to block some but not all streaming content sites reflects yet another challenge that organizations are facing related to streaming content. Even as they ban some sites, organizations must balance their need to preserve network bandwidth, while still retaining access to sites that employees utilize for job related activities, such as marketing or professional networking.

So where does your workplace fall on this continuum from total restriction to total access of streaming content? Has the ongoing struggle for sufficient bandwidth forced your organization to block streaming content? Is bandwidth capacity the issue or is the ban more closely related to questions about employee productivity or other factors?

For more news like this, sign up to receive our weekly newsletters here.

What is the Difference Between an MCO and a TPA?

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If you are responsible for your workers’ compensation program, it is important to have a fundamental understanding of the roles of a MCO and a Workers’ Compensation Third Party Administrator (TPA). MCOs and TPAs play unique roles in helping employers control workers’ compensation costs.

What is a MCO?

Under Ohio's Health Partnership Program, MCOs are responsible for the medical management of Ohio employers’ work-related injuries and illnesses. Every employer in Ohio must have a MCO, which is paid for directly by the Bureau of Worker's Compensation.

The core MCO functions include:

  • Collecting initial injury reports and transmitting to BWC;
  • Management and authorization of medical treatment to be received by an injured worker;
  • Medical review and bill payment processing;
  • Maintaining a network of BWC-certified healthcare providers;
  • Return to work services;
  • Utilization review;
  • Providing Peer Reviews as necessary for treatment decisions;
  • Processing treatment appeals through the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) process; and
  • Training and education.

Further, MCO associates are medical professionals and their processes are clinically focused. They work diligently to help employers avoid the most costly of claims, i.e. lost time claims – when an injured worker is off work for eight or more consecutive days. With clinicians managing the medical care and transitioning injured workers back to gainful employment, employers are better able to manage their long term insurance premiums.

What is a TPA?

A Third Party Administrator (TPA) assists employers in the administrative and financial aspects of a claim.

The core TPA responsibilities include:

  • Providing risk management consulting to employers;
  • Administering compensation group rating savings programs and other discount program consulting;
  • Pertinent claims investigation;
  • Claims administration;
  • Industrial Commission hearing attendance;
  • Evaluation of claims for workers' compensation coverage; and
  • Assisting employers in the development of workers' compensation cost control strategies.


TPA staff typically consists of claim representatives, account representatives, and other workers' compensation professionals. 

ERC is proud to endorse CareWorks as the preferred workers’ compensation Managed Care Organization (MCO) for members. For more information, click here.

6 Ways to Help Employees Get Along

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6 Ways to Help Employees Get Along

Sometimes employees don't get along and these conflicts and office disagreements can dampen productivity, waste time, reduce a team's performance, make the work environment tense and uncomfortable, and increase stress in work groups - none of which are beneficial to your business. Here are a few ways managers can help reduce conflict on their teams.

1. Set the tone

Managers and leaders set the tone for team interactions by what they say or do when conflict or problems emerge between their employees, how they manage conflict with their own peers, and what behavior they tolerate. If managers act passive-aggressive, disrespect fellow employees, or do not directly deal with conflict, employees will follow their lead.

2. Hire team-players

Hiring employees who have strong interpersonal, team-building, and internal customer service skills can decrease the likelihood of conflicts. While it's tough to predict how well a candidate will interact with your team, a solid personality or style assessment and behavioral interview as well as asking for references can help.  

3. Don't ignore conflicts

Managers have a tendency to ignore problems with poor team-players or team conflicts until they escalate. Instead they should encourage employees to collaborate on a solution and seek coaching and/or training for current employees who argue with coworkers, don't provide good internal service, or are overly critical or judgmental of others. It's critical to not let conflict spiral out of control.

4. Educate on styles and generational differences

Great teams are melting pots of different generations and backgrounds. Each employee brings a different personality and style to the table. Most conflict stems from not fully appreciating who another person is, their background, and the strengths of their individual style. Spend time educating your team on style and generational differences.

5. Spend time interacting

Developing common ground is one of the most important ways to fend off conflict in the workplace and it's achieved in the simplest of ways: spending more time with one another. Informally interacting and talking is one of the best ways to get employees familiar with one another. When they eventually find common ground, magic happens.

6. Reward teamwork

Most managers want teamwork, but reward individual achievement. Recognizing and rewarding teamwork, collaboration, and supportive interactions and promoting or giving choice assignments to employees who act like team players helps promote and encourage a supportive work environment.

When conflict strikes in the workplace, your managers are the best people to nip it in the bud, deal with it, and prevent it.

Conflict Resolution & Mediation Training

Conflict Resolution & Mediation Training

The course demonstrates how constructive conflict resolution techniques can be useful.

Train Your Employees

4 Strategies to Combat Turnover

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Turnover is a reality for every business. It can be a warning sign that something is wrong with our workplace, managers, or teams that needs to be fixed. It can also signal that we might be hiring poor fits into the organization.

The problem of turnover demands that we understand why we are not able to retain some of our employees and fix it before the situation spirals and we lose many talented employees. Here are 4 strategies to combat turnover.

Step 1: Track it.

The first step to deal with turnover is to track and benchmark it. You must understand how your numbers compare to normal turnover for your industry and size and if the turnover you are experiencing is healthy or unhealthy for your business. For example, are your best employees leaving or are your new-hires leaving, and is turnover primarily voluntary or involuntary? At a minimum, track the following types of turnover:

  • Voluntary and involuntary turnover
  • All employee and top performer turnover
  • New-hire turnover at intervals (90 days, 180 days, and 1 year)

Step 2: Research the context.

The second step in combating turnover is to research the context of the termination, including the work area affected and characteristics of the employee. You'll also want to explore the former employee's reason for leaving as well as their supervisor's and coworkers' feedback on the termination. Turnover issues tend to follow a pattern so look for trends in the following:

  • Work area (location, division, department, team, and supervisor)
  • Individual characteristics (length of service, performance, type of job)
  • Reason for leaving (per exit interview/survey)
  • Supervisor and team feedback

Step 3: Identify critical incidences.

Turnover is generally not caused by a single workplace event. Research shows that turnover results from a process of progressive disengagement, which can take weeks, months, and sometimes even years to escalate to a final decision. Eventually, however, a critical incident causes an employee to decide to quit.

To understand the cause of turnover and fix it, you need to identify these critical turning points and causes of disengagement so that repeat scenarios with other employees are prevented. Examine what went wrong, what you could have done differently, and how you will approach a similar situation in the future.

Step 4: Implement interventions.

After determining the causes and context of turnover and putting together the pieces of each former employee's story, there are several major interventions that you can use to solve turnover problems. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Job design: changing a job's design, reducing workload, providing more training, or enhancing employees' skills
  • Management: training or developing a manager's skills, removing a manager from their position, improving performance management or feedback
  • Hiring and selection: making a change in the hiring or selection procedure, enhancing on-boarding
  • Communication: communicating changes and reasons for changes, being sensitive to and dealing with employee reactions, managing and mediating coworker conflict
  • Total rewards: making changes to pay and benefits, enhancing advancement opportunities, enhancing work/life benefits

Turnover is as critical to monitor and address as expenses in your organization. It is a lost investment in your business that can take significant time and money to recover, especially when you lose a high performer. While there’s no magic bullet solution to prevent it, your organization can better manage turnover by tracking it, better understanding why it happens, and implementing interventions that deal with it.

Additional Resources

2012 ERC Turnover & HR Department Practices Survey
This survey collected information from Northeast Ohio employers on voluntary and involuntary turnover of employees and new-hires as well as HR department practices including the role of HR, common HR metrics and benchmarks, and the use of technology and information systems within the HR department.

How to Build Your Own Great Workplace

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At ERC, we believe that creating a great workplace is about creating an environment and culture that supports the talent your organization needs to be and stay successful. It means creating a place in which great talent want to come work and where they want to stay and build their career. It’s about enabling superior performance and eliminating the policies, practices, and norms in your workplace that hinder your top people’s success, progress, and innovation.

If this sounds like something your organization wants to achieve, here are 5 steps we recommend for creating a great workplace.

1. Commit to creating a great workplace.

Making a true commitment to be an employer of choice is the first and hardest part of creating a great workplace. It requires getting your management team on-board with their support, securing and committing resources for the initiative, and creating a vision of where you see your workplace in the next 3-5 years. It also entails meeting regularly with your managers to talk about and identify ways to enhance your workplace. You can't create a great workplace without your leadership and managers on-board, the willingness to put resources behind the effort, and on-going discussion.

2. Identify your top performers.

Great workplaces are built from great people. This requires hiring the right people from your receptionist to line employees to managers to top leadership. Rarely do organizations have all the right people. This is why it is especially important to identify who your top performers are and define what attributes top performers have at your organization. Knowing which employees are successful and why they are effective will help you hire more of those people, create a workplace that meets their needs, and weed out the wrong fits.

3. Ask employees for their feedback.

Great workplaces have feedback-rich cultures that care about, appreciate, and use employees' input, ideas, and opinions. To create and maintain a great workplace, you need to know what engages your people, specifically what would make them stay, what would make them leave, and what is important to them. In our experience, the answers to these questions (though similar) vary by organization. Whether it's conducting one-on-ones, focus group discussions, or an engagement survey, start somewhere and invite employees to share their feedback.

4. Benchmark your practices.

Data and measurement are important parts of creating a great place to work. In order to create a great workplace, you must gauge how you stack up against other employers of choice – how your total rewards package, policies, culture, and results compare to the standards set by best-in-class organizations. This not only helps your organization determine what it takes to be a great place to work, but after determining where the gaps are, you can develop strategies to help build, change, and enhance your policies and practices.

5. Evaluate your progress.

Building a great place to work is an on-going endeavor – it never ends. It will require constant attention, changes, and improvements. It will also require that you monitor and evaluate your progress regularly to make sure that you are meeting your goals in becoming a great place to work.

If your organization is progressing towards becoming a great place to work, over time it will see its investments pay off. Attracting and hiring top talent gets easier, great talent sticks around, your workforce is more engaged and productive, and your workplace’s reputation improves. The road to a great workplace is undoubtedly a path that is worth pursuing if your organization wants to secure top talent to achieve long-term success.

Additional Resources

NorthCoast 99 – 99 Best Places to Work in Northeast Ohio If your organization is interested in being recognized as a best place to work and thinks it excels at attracting and retaining top talent, begin your application today!

Benchmark Reports Interested in targeted metrics for top performers and benchmarking how your organization's practices for attracting and retaining top talent compare to others in the region? Please take a look at our benchmark reports which provide tons of information on great workplaces and top performers.

Consulting & Project Assistance
ERC is a leading provider of quality, affordable human resources consulting services in Ohio. Our HR consulting services provide the crucial strategic and technical expertise needed to support your HR goals and workplace initiatives.

Travel Expense Practices Remain Stable, Despite Rising Costs

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The 2012 EAA National Sales Compensation & Practices Survey, which surveyed nearly 800 organizations throughout the United States, shows that employers are reimbursing sales employees for a number of different travel expenses.

  • Over 80% of employers pay for economical air fare and around 10% pay for business class air fare. Over 90% of employers allow employees to keep their air fare frequent flyer miles for personal use.
  • Over 85% of employers reimburse for most transportation-related expenses including bus and cab fares as well as parking and highway toll fees. Slightly fewer organizations reimburse for transportation-related gratuities.
  • Company cars are only provided by 32% of respondents, with most employers (over 80%) reimbursing for employees’ use of their personal cars. About two-thirds of employers reimburse via straight cents per mile (typically at the IRS rate) and 20% reimburse via a combination of straight cents per mile and a flat amount per month to cover general vehicle wear and tear.
  • The widespread majority of employers do not clearly define expense reimbursement practices pertaining to entertainment, lodging, and meals. Over 70% of employers indicate that they simply reimburse for reasonable expenses related to these.

The survey shows that travel expense reimbursement practices for sales professionals have remained relatively stable with little change over the past five years, except for a slight decline in the use of company cars, a slight increase in mileage reimbursement, and an uptick in the number of employers simplifying their reimbursement practices for entertainment, lodging, and meals.

As gas and transportation prices continue to rise, however, employers need to ensure that their travel reimbursement practices continue to keep pace in order to attract and retain top sales professionals whose work involves significant travel.

“We’ve found that travel expense reimbursement can sometimes be a retention issue for sales employees – especially when employees perceive expense reimbursement practices to be unfair or not in line with what is provided by other companies, or when the costs of paying for transportation begin to affect their compensation,” says an ERC HR Consultant. She explains, “To retain quality sales people, employers need to be mindful of how rising gas and transportation costs are impacting their sales employees’ take-home pay.”

For more information about our Compensation & Salary Surveys or to purchase them, please click here.

Additional Resources

Professional Travel

Benchmark your company’s travel practices and expenses with a complimentary review from ERC’s Preferred Partner Professional Travel. Most employers realize a savings of 12% to 17%! Learn more about the cost savings and employee safety benefits of having a managed travel program.

9 Common (and Avoidable) FMLA Mistakes

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There is probably no law that gives HR more headaches than the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Even the most adept and experienced HR professionals make errors when administering FMLA. It’s hard not to make mistakes, given the emergence of new case law as well as state and federal regulations that are constantly expanding the scope of employee leave and employer’s obligations in administering that leave.

One small mistake with FMLA, however, can cause big consequences for your organization. Here are 9 of the most common (and avoidable) FMLA mistakes.

  1. Not counting leave as FMLA. If your organization does not run FMLA concurrently with other paid time off, sick leave, disability, or worker’s compensation, it may incur lost work time which can lead to significant costs. Also, some employers may not track time that should be qualified as FMLA leave, especially when reasons for employees’ leave or time off are not known by HR.
  2. Disciplining employees for FMLA-protected absences. It’s not uncommon for employers to penalize employees for absences, but when FMLA factors into the absence, tread carefully. If employees are eligible for FMLA and are qualified to take leave, they are protected, even though your attendance policy may be very specific. Disciplining or terminating an employee for taking leave may not be an appropriate or legal measure to take.
  3. Taking adverse action after denying leave. Denying an employee’s request for FMLA and then taking a series of adverse actions following that request can be a fatal mistake. While these actions may be warranted, employers need to watch their timing. If you deny an employee’s request for FMLA, then immediately follow-up with a termination, it could suggest that the employee’s FMLA request was linked to the termination. Plus, the courts have been especially mindful of retaliation charges lately.
  4. Failing to communicate your FMLA policy and procedure. As an employer, you must let employees know about their rights under FMLA. A 2012 ruling suggests that you must also communicate the procedure by which leave needs to be taken and how you are tracking employees’ time (i.e. rolling calendar year measured forward/measured backward etc.). Even misinforming employees of the time in which they are eligible for FMLA can be a liability.
  5. Allowing your supervisors to manage FMLA. Supervisors are usually the first people employees turn to when they need to take leave. Sometimes, however, supervisors don’t realize that they must direct the employee to HR and not handle FMLA cases on their own. Be sure that your supervisors know how to respond when employees ask for leave. Otherwise they could face personal liability for FMLA violations.
  6. Making assumptions about an employee’s health condition. Making judgments about whether employees have a serious health condition or not without the necessary information can be disadvantageous. Employees may present clear signs of a serious health problem or the condition may be less visible. Take each employee’s request for FMLA seriously and ask for appropriate documentation if you question its validity.
  7. Not verifying or clarifying FMLA documentation with health care providers. Employers may clarify any documentation they receive from health care providers, ask for second and third opinions, and make sure that the employee who is requesting leave does in fact have a serious health condition. Also, know that requiring too much or too little medical documentation could result in liability. Don’t ask for too much, but don’t accept too little.
  8. Removing an employee from their prior job. An employee goes out on leave, perhaps you find that another employee can perform the person’s job better, and then you consider terminating the returning employee or moving them into a lower position. Be aware that unless you have adequate performance documentation to demote or terminate the individual, FMLA regulations say that the returning employee is entitled to their same job or one of equal pay, responsibility, and benefits.
  9. Not providing a reasonable accommodation. Although FMLA only allows for 12 weeks of unpaid leave, your organization may need to explore other reasonable accommodations following FMLA leave if employees have a disability or medical condition that is protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Under ADA, an extension of unpaid leave could be a reasonable accommodation in some circumstances. Oftentimes, both FMLA and ADA apply, especially when serious health conditions are present.

Employers unfortunately can pay a steep price for their mistakes in administering FMLA—whether they are honest or intentional. Our best advice for avoiding FMLA mistakes is to maintain open lines of communication with employees and managers, stay up to date on FMLA case law, don’t make assumptions, keep excellent documentation, and be conscious of the timing of your decisions.

Please note that by providing you with research information that may be contained in this article, ERC is not providing a qualified legal opinion. As such, research information that ERC provides to its members should not be relied upon or considered a substitute for legal advice. The information that we provide is for general employer use and not necessarily for individual application. 

Tips to Successfully On-Board Your New Hire

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A new job is an important decision in an employee's life and can elicit a number of emotions ranging from nervousness to excitement prior to the first day. HR can play an important role in capitalizing on these positive feelings and engaging new-hires throughout their first days. Here are some tips for successfully on-boarding your new-hire.

Make the pre-employment experience memorable.

Consider sending your new-hire a simple welcome package, calling them prior to their first day to welcome them, inviting them to a company event, and/or  sending a hand-written note or card. These unexpected, small gestures show that you are looking forward to working with the new-hire and reinforces their decision to come work for your organization. It also sends a positive message to their families.

Eliminate your probationary or introductory period.

Not only are these 90-day periods less common than they were several years ago, but there is no place for them in the workplace if you are confident that you have selected a great employee for the job. Requiring these periods in order for employees to continue employment and/or receive certain benefits tends to send the message that your new-hire "has to pass the test" to be a true employee of your organization and that you don't trust their potential. Is that the message you want to send to your new employee, and haven't they already passed the test if you made a good hiring decision?

Be prepared on day one.

Be ready for the new-hire when they arrive on their first day. Treat them like a guest by being ready at the front door, giving a guided tour, making introductions to staff members, providing lunch, and helping them at every step throughout the day. Ensure that their workspace is clean, stocked, and ready for work and that they have all the tools necessary to do the job, including proper equipment and computer programs. Make their first day as pleasant and as organized as possible and limit time spent on paperwork.

Cover the big picture.

Sometimes employers are so eager to get their new-hires working that they don't spend time educating them on the big picture, such as what the company does; it's history, mission, and vision for the future; its values and culture; its product and service offerings; industry; the markets and communities it serves; and the organization's structure. Spending time covering all of the core aspects of your organization's business is critical to helping the new-hire understand how their role fits into the organization.

Encourage relationship-building.

Provide time for your new-hire to build relationships with their supervisor and fellow team members by coordinating team events, social outings, one-on-one meetings, retreats, or other activities to help them learn about their fellow coworkers and build relationships with them. In addition, consider including your leadership team in the on-boarding process. Introducing new employees to senior management and allowing time to get to know them can build a sense of comfort, trust, and security in the leadership team.

Spend enough time on training and provide a mentor.

Surprisingly, many organizations don't spend enough time training their new-hires upfront, which can lead to a host of issues later. While you may want to get your new-hire started on tasks and projects, it's important to recognize that every new-hire (regardless of experience) will need training. Don't assume that they can just jump into the work with little direction or knowledge of your internal processes. If possible, also assign a "buddy" or mentor to help the employee learn and assimilate into the organization.

Ask for their feedback.

Throughout the first few months, it's important to establish checkpoints with your new-hire. If your organization doesn't have a formal feedback or survey process, ask new-hires a few simple questions - if the job is what they expected, what challenges they are experiencing, and if they are being provided with the right amount of training and support. Keep the lines of communication open with your new-hire to ensure that when a problem or misunderstanding arises, it is dealt with quickly.

On-boarding is about investing in employee retention, engagement, and productivity, so if you want to make sure your new-hire stays and thrives, consider these on-boarding practices. They are best practices from employers of choice in the region - NorthCoast 99 winners (www.northcoast99.org) - and will ensure that your new-hires are engaged and productive from the start.

5 Myths About Workplace Communication

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5 Myths About Workplace Communication

Employers constantly find themselves battling communication issues between employees and managers in the workplace. These issues commonly stem from not understanding the basics of good communication, mistaking frequency for quality, and making inaccurate assumptions about how much information others want and need to know. Here are 5 myths about workplace communication that your organization should consider "debunking" to improve communication.

1. If your employees are talking to you frequently, you have good communication.

Regular one-on-one "catch up" meetings between your employees and supervisors do not guarantee that quality communication is taking place. Despite these meetings, misunderstandings and communication breakdowns can still happen. Frequency of communication, while important, has little to do with how effective the communication between your supervisors and employees actually is. Focus instead of what is actually being discussed in those meetings and how it's being said.

2. Line employees are the main reason that communication suffers in the workplace.

Sometimes...but not usually. Effective communication is important at all levels of the organization, but is most important and more commonly expected at the manager level. After all, managers spend the majority of their time communicating with all levels of the organization, including other departments, employees, managers, and leaders. Their job is to make sure people have the information they need to do their jobs well and that they have the information necessary to manage their departments and employees. This involves sharing lots of information and asking lots of questions. As a result, when there is a communication problem, it usually falls on the manager.

3. An open-door policy is enough to encourage employees to share their concerns and ideas.

If you think that your organization's open-door policy is enough to encourage employees' sharing of opinions, ideas, and concerns, you're probably placing too much faith in your policy. Simply saying that your organization has an open-door policy does not necessarily ensure that employees will actually take advantage of this policy and voice their concerns to management. You will probably need to make more proactive attempts to gather employees' ideas and encourage their input if you value two-way communication with your staff.

4. Employees aren't interested in, privy to, or already know information.

This may be true for some of your employees, but not of all of them. Many employees desire more information about the organization and what it's trying to achieve, and your organization has a responsibility to share it with them. When employees are treated as partners in the business and given access to sensitive information, they are more likely to engage in their work and create greater value for your business. Additionally, never assume that employees already know something that is important for them to do their job. A good deal of communication problems result from assuming that people already know information they actually don't know.

5. Information is the foundation of good workplace communication.

Information is important, but trust and communication skills are the true foundations of good communication in the workplace, and both need to be developed over time. Trust is also one of the major reasons communication fails in the workplace. When departments don't trust other departments, employees don't trust their managers, and leaders don't trust employees, information gets withheld, decisions are made without consulting others, conflicts emerge, and everyone starts choosing their words less wisely and thoughtfully. Similarly, communication skills need to be built and fostered among all levels of your employees, and especially your managers, through training, coaching, and practice.

Communication issues affect every organization, but "debunking" common myths and assumptions about communication can be a good first step to improve communication in your organization and especially between your managers and employees.

Additional Resources

Supervisory Series
In this series, participants will gain an understanding of how to communicate effectively with others in the workplace, in addition to dealing with everyday challenges of being a supervisor, resolving workplace conflict, and managing performance and coaching. This series is offered in AM sessions and PM sessions and begins February 7th.

Communication & Interpersonal Skills TrainingERC specializes in communication, interpersonal, and soft-skills training for all levels of the organization. Click here to view the many training courses we offer. These courses can also be customized to meet the needs of your organization.  For more information, please contact ckutsko@yourerc.com.

Communication Skills Training