I Used to Be Their Friend, Now I'm Their Boss

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Friendships in the workplace aren’t bad (in fact, they can be very positive), but young workers have a tendency to view their coworkers as friends more than other employees. When friends start getting promoted and managing one another, these relationships can pose problems.

How to identify the ‘friend’

This is a leader that is congenial, well-liked, and has above average soft-skills. They are extremely supportive of their employees and approach management interactions more like coworker relationships.

This individual refrains from having tough or crucial conversations with their employees and fails to acknowledge or manage conflict, frequently avoiding it altogether.

They often don’t manage performance well, and put up with poor results to maintain a positive relationship.

In essence, they focus on being their employees’ friend, rather than their manager or leader. In fact, some of these leaders may be managing previous coworkers or friends of theirs. They may even engage in behaviors that are considered unprofessional for a leader, such as participating in informal social activities, becoming Facebook friends with their subordinates, or gossiping about other employees.

How to develop

This individual doesn’t necessarily need training in soft skills, but does need training on core management principles, such as performance management, feedback, and conflict management.

These will be uncomfortable topics for this individual that you may need to address multiple times. They may also need to be coached on how to balance creating supportive relationships and interactions with their employees with results and getting the job done.

Some will also need to better understand the role of the leader and how to act professionally with their employees.

Supervisory Training

A lot of the time, an employee who has recently been promoted to a supervisor role doesn't always have the resources available to them to be a successful leader. By sending your employee through a supervisor training series, it will teach them the fundamental topics that any manager would need in order to lead in the most effective manner.

In the end, it will not only benefit the employee, but also the company to have a well-skilled supervisor helping operate the organization.

Interested in learning more about training your supervisors?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a video highlighting our process and a brochure featuring our courses, delivery methods, and success stories.

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What Are the Changes to the New FMLA Ruling?

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What Are the Changes to the New FMLA Ruling? recent fmla changes fmla updates

As of March 27, 2015,  another change to the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) will be followed by employers nationwide. There is now a revised definition of “spouse” and it includes same-sex married couples in all 50 states.

 The Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a change to the FMLA’s definition of “spouse.” The recent FMLA changes are stated as:
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5 “High-Tech” Hiring Practices to Improve Your Talent Pool

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5 “High-Tech” Hiring Practices to Improve Your Talent Pool

1. Post a job opening on an online job board

Even if you don’t have a fancy applicant tracking system internally, almost all employers, 89% according to the 2013 ERC Hiring Practices Survey are putting their job postings up on some sort of external job board website. Most of these job boards are easy to navigate and should be a matter of simply inputting the information about the job opening and maybe a few pieces of information about your organization.

If the site allows applicants to fill out an online application or submit a resume through their site and funnel that onto you, make sure you review the process from an applicant’s standpoint as well. You don’t want to frustrate potential candidates with a process that your organization didn’t even create before they even get their resume into your email box!
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Take Your Meetings from Unproductive to Motivating

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Take Your Meetings from Unproductive to Motivating

At any company, long and drawn out meetings can be a stressful use of time, and you may ask yourself 'Is this meeting even necessary?" Meetings are the most universal—and sometimes universally despised—part of business life.

However, meetings are necessary in the business world, and with the right tools and approach, your meetings can become engaging, successful and well-received. There are a number of steps that you can take to make this happen.
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3 Facts about Measles and the Workplace

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3 Facts about Measles and the Workplace

In 2015, measles was rising health concern in the country. Organization's everywhere wondered what they should do in the event that one of their employees is diagnosed with measles, and how they can prevent other employees from future contact.

Here are four facts about what can and cannot happen when measles comes to your office.

Fact #1:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) no longer provides short-term impairments from its definition of "disability." According to an article on workforce.com, "there is an argument to be made that the measles could qualify as an ADA-disability, provided that it substantially limits a major life activity of the sufferer."

However, considering people infected with measles are out for about a  week, it would be difficult to make a case that a one-week impairment could "substantially limit a major life activity" of the infected.

Fact #2:

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, private employers can require vaccinations as long as they are willing to accommodate employees' disabilities and religions. Employers can review any of these accommodations under the ADA and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, as well as similar state and local laws.

However, many states do not have a mandatory policy in place. It also depends on the sector in which you work. An organization in the healthcare sector may have a mandatory vaccine program for its employees since they are more likely to run the risk of coming in contact with a disease like the measles. However, organizations in other industries don't necessarily run the same risks.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) states, "Generally, ADA-covered employers should consider simply encouraging employees to get the influenza vaccine rather than requiring them to take it." Even though you run risks when mandating your employees to get vaccinated, another option is to always hold an education seminar on the risks of not being vaccinated.

Fact #3:

Employers can use an ADA-compliant pandemic employee sample survey to give to their employees. On the survey, employees can be asked medical and non-medical questions about the ability of the employee to come to work, in the event of a pandemic. This survey will help give employers information they need to plan if a pandemic happens, and how to shield employers from receiving information about any illnesses that employees might have.

Before an issue arises in your workplace, it's a best practice to stay up-to-date on the Center for Disease Control, federal, state, and local public health guidelines and to also stay mindful of any anti-discrimination laws.

HR, compliance, termination, or compensation questions?

ERC has a team of HR Help Desk Advisors to provide timely and trusted answers.

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FMLA Expands to Include More Employees in Same-Sex Marriages

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FMLA Expands to Include More Employees in Same-Sex Marriages

In its 20 plus years on the books, administration of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) has long been viewed as a complicated and challenging task faced by employers of all shapes and sizes – or at least for those with 50 or more employees.

Despite seemingly countless revisions since its inception, FMLA has become an integral part of US employment law and, despite administrative challenges, has provided families and individuals with previously unimaginable opportunities to take time away from work to care for loved ones without fear of losing their jobs.
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Training Your Interns: An Investment in Your Company’s Future

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Training Your Interns: An Investment in Your Company’s Future

Providing employees with opportunities for training and development is typically framed in terms of a long term investment by the employer. You, the employer, invest time and resources into developing an employee’s skill set and in turn they become a more valuable contributor. Ideally, this employee feels appreciated and valued enough to stick around and make your investment worthwhile.

So why, according to the 2014 Intern & Recent Grad Survey, do almost half (44%) of the Northeast Ohio organizations that participated provide one or more formalized training opportunities to their interns? Plus, as it turns out, the training and development of interns doesn’t stop with formal training programs, but also includes a wide variety of valuable development tools that can be applied to any employee.
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6 Ways to Motivate and Retain Millennials

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6 Ways to Motivate and Retain Millennials

By 2030, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that Millennials will comprise approximately 75% of the American workforce. The Millennial generation, born between 1980 and 1995, equal about 80 million Americans and are those in our workplaces between the ages of 20 and 35.

Millennials are praised for being the most educated and culturally-diverse generation of our time, but with the praise also comes stereotyping. Millennials have earned the stigma of being "job hoppers" because of the lack of appreciation they have for traditional methods of promotion and advancement within an organization; if they don’t see enough opportunity for growth and advancement, they will leave.  They are also labeled as having “no work ethic,” because they work in different ways, leveraging technology and the flexibility it allows.
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