4 Things to Know About E-Verify

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The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 forbids employers from "knowingly hiring illegal workers." Employers must comply with this law by verifying the eligibility of prospective employees to work in the U.S by gathering information on the I-9 form. One way to do this is by using E-Verify, an electronic way of verifying employment eligibility based on U.S. requirements.

What is E-Verify?

E-Verify is a free online system operated by the federal government which allows an employer to determine the eligibility of an employee to work in the United States by comparing information reported on an employee's I-9 form to data from U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Social Security Administration records.
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How to Set Compensation in 5 Easy Steps

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Salaries are a business investment, and in order to make sure that you set fair and competitive compensation for jobs it’s important to use a structured method for setting compensation as opposed to choosing a random salary or simply using one salary survey or compensation source.

Employers generally determine salaries based on five (5) types of information: the job's responsibilities, what their competitors are paying, how valuable the job is to their organization, how they pay people in similar roles based on their pay structure, and their budget/organizational needs.

With this in mind, here are five (5) easy steps for setting compensation.
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ERC and ease@work Offer New Small Business EAP

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ERC is thrilled to partner with ease@work to provide small businesses an affordable solution for employee assistance programs.

The ease@work/ERC program provides small businesses an affordable approach to accessing a full-service EAP. The services in this group purchased program help employers address workplace issues like absenteeism, substance abuse, conflict or stress in the workplace, and provides all the other offerings of a full-service EAP, at a cost that’s affordable to small businesses. EAP’s are an outstanding employee benefit and support the attraction and retention of top performing employees.

“ease@work has been a tremendous partner of ours for many years providing employee assistance programs to our members, and we’re excited about making this an affordable option for small businesses. ERC is proud to be a client for this innovative program,” said Pat Perry, President of ERC.

“For almost 10 years, ease@work has recognized the need to bring quality EAP services to the growing small-business market,” said Janet M. Schiavoni, Director at ease@work. “We are thrilled that we have reached an agreement with ERC that expands our partnership which allows our program to be an affordable benefit for organizations of any size.”

For more information on how ease@work can help your organization click here.

SEC Proposes CEO Pay Ratio Rule

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The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed a rule in 2013, required under the Dodd-Frank Act, which would require companies to disclose a pay ratio of their chief executive officer's compensation to the median total compensation of all of its employees (for the last fiscal year).

The SEC would not prescribe a specific method for organizations to use when calculating a pay ratio, and companies would have the flexibility to determine the median annual total compensation among their employees and make reasonable estimates when calculating elements of and employees' total compensation.  In addition, in the proposed rule, "employee" is defined as any employee who is full-time, part-time, temporary, seasonal, and non-U.S; employed by the company or any of its subsidiaries; and employed as of the last day of the company's prior fiscal year.

Companies would be required to disclose the method they used to identify the median and total compensation as well as any amounts that are estimated.

Source: Securities and Exchange Commission (2013). SEC Proposes Rules for Pay Ratio Disclosure

8 Ways to Get the Employee Behavior You Want

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8 Ways to Get the Employee Behavior You Want

Behavior is central to a productive and successful workplace. It affects how we pay people for what they merit, who we promote, and what we recognize and reward. And, ultimately, how our employees behave day to day ends up significantly affecting our culture and business.

Because of this, it’s critically important for organizations to make sure that their employees’ behavior matches what is needed in the organization. This includes the basics (respect, honesty, etc.), but also the behaviors that are crucial to the business' success (creativity, initiative, risk taking, etc.).

Much of what we try to do as managers is steer employees to behave in the ways that we want them to. We want them to stop complaining, take more initiative, produce better quality work, improve their performance, serve our customers better, act like leaders, and the list goes on. Essentially, we want them to change their behavior, and we're often stumped (and sometimes even baffled) over how to do it. Influencing and changing behavior is tricky in the workplace. Fortunately, there are some "tried and true" ways to do it.

Here are eight ways to get the employee behavior you want.
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Will New DOL Regulations for Direct Care Workers Drive Changes in Pay?

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Here in Northeast Ohio, it is well known that the healthcare industry is by far the largest in the region, employing thousands upon thousands of workers in a wide range of positions (and salaries). One position type that has made headlines in recent weeks is the “direct care worker."

Although not typically the subject of high profile news stories these employees (e.g. home health aides) will soon be seeing a significant change in how they are paid. Nationally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) suggests that approximately 1.9 million workers across the country would be re-classified by the Department of Labor (DOL) under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and this could mean big changes for the fifteen-thousand or so home health aides employed in the immediate area.
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6 Answers To Your Health Care Reform Questions

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How are health insurance rates being affected by health care reform? Now that the notices have been sent and exchanges have launched, what's next for employers? Here are six (6) answers to commonly asked questions on health care reform currently.

1. How are health insurance rates being affected by health care reform?

Currently, health insurance rates have been only modestly affected by health care reform, although this trend is not expected to continue. A 2013 survey conducted by Towers Watson reports that the average total cost of health care is projected to rise by 5.2% in 2014, while a survey by PriceWaterhouseCoopers shows an expected 6.5% increase. Most national surveys have been reporting stable costs (if not slightly lower) from 2012, and our surveys of local employers have also seen stable and slightly lower average premium increases from the last few years.
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4 Important Workplace Wellness Trends You Need to Know

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Employee wellness continues to expand and change in the workplace as organizations use wellness programs to combat rising health care costs and support the development of healthy lifestyles in their workforce. Here's an overview of the state of employee wellness, and specifically 4 important wellness trends you need to know including an analysis of employer programs and practices, incentives, return on investment and drivers of effectiveness, and new things employers are doing in the area of wellness.

1. Programs & Practices

Health and wellness program offerings are expanding in the workplace, according to a few local and national surveys.

The Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM) 2013 Employee Benefits Survey shows that when compared to 2009, more employers are offering health and lifestyle coaching and onsite fitness classes. In addition, the most common wellness options in which more than half of respondents offered were wellness resources and information, wellness programs, onsite seasonal flu vaccines, wellness publications, a 24-hour nurse line, and health screening programs.
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E-Cigarettes: Implications for the Workplace

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Electronic cigarettes, otherwise known as "e-cigarettes," are becoming a hot issue in the workplace these days.

Increased usage of e-cigarettes, is leading employers to review their policies with regard to smoking in the workplace. According to Crain's Cleveland Business, the rise in usage of these devices and expected increase in demand for these devices is causing local companies in Northeast Ohio to have concerns over how to handle these devices with their employees.

Experts suggest that employers should include e-cigarettes among tobacco-use products, as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not consider them to be tobacco cessation devices, and they aren't regulated.
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3 Strategies for Managing Your Healthcare Costs

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Rising healthcare costs are consistently cited in ERC’s research as a top concern among employers in Northeast Ohio. Interestingly, data from sources ranging from local (ERC) to national (Kaiser Family Foundation) have shown more moderate percent increases in health insurance premiums in 2013. The reasons for these increases, no matter how large or small, are multi-faceted and difficult to measure, but for a glimpse at how many area organizations managing these increases, we turn to the 2013 ERC Wellness Practices Survey.

1) Empowering employees

Much like in 2011, when the Wellness Survey was last conducted, the 2013 results suggest that organizations are still largely focusing on methods of cost control that empower employees to make better decisions related to their overall health. In particular, the top two methods of cost control, “educating employees to be better health consumers” and “creating wellness programs” (both used by about two-thirds of employers) rely heavily on employees to make well informed choices. It is also worth noting that while both of these options rely heavily on employees, they also give employers the opportunity to influence and structure the various programs that fall under these categories in order to fit the organization’s workforce demographics and culture to maximize the effectiveness of the programs.
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