The 8 Defining Qualities of Top Talent

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Over the years, ERC has researched what distinguishes a top performer from an average performer based on employers' perspectives. The results are strikingly consistent across industries and sizes. Regardless of the organization type, most employers define top performers very similarly and are looking for the same types of characteristics and behaviors in their employees.

What makes top talent different from average talent? Typically, these eight key qualities. 

1. They achieve results.

Top performers consistently achieve results and make positive contributions to their organizations. They "wow" customers, produce quality work, improve productivity, make good decisions, and model the right behaviors that lead to their success. They remain committed to excelling at their work despite challenges, and try different ideas and strategies to improve their results.

2. They're a go-to person.

Top performers are sought-after employees in the organization - not only because of their impressive knowledge and talents, but because they are easy to work with and dependable. They tend to be well-respected and valued by others in the organization for their abilities, insights, and perhaps creativity. They are often technical and functional experts that others can rely on to do the work well. They know their stuff and have a good reputation. They help other employees solve their problems.

3. They go above and beyond.

This is the classic differentiator of a top performer. Top talent do more than is expected and required in small and large ways. They seek opportunities to expand their responsibilities, challenge and develop themselves, and go above and beyond their jobs and to meet others' needs - including those of their coworkers and customers. They also typically perform above goals and standards.

4. They take initiative.

Top performers don't wait for someone to tell them to do a task. They begin new assignments before they are told, look for work to fill spare time, explore ways to solve problems or challenges, see new opportunities, volunteer for extra tasks, and can work well with little supervision.  They anticipate what needs to be done and make suggestions for how to add value, do things better, and work more efficiently. They act like a leader even when it may not be their job.

5. They're self-motivated.

Top performers usually don't need to be motivated in order to get the job done and done well. Their motivation is self-driven. They know their passions, interests, and priorities and pursue work that aligns with those. They typically have a purpose, set their goals high, and are persistent in reaching them. Their self-motivation fuels lifelong learning and development. They don't need to be told to develop skills because they usually are already taking steps to make themselves more valuable to the organization.

6. They think big-picture.

Unlike average performers, you can count on top performers to "get it." They strive to understand the organization's direction and goals and think beyond their immediate job. They may suggest enhancements to other areas of the organization, help coworkers or other departments, and align their personal objectives and priorities with those of the organization. They display an interest in helping the organization move forward and ask for opportunities to impact the organization.

7. They are a team player.

Top performers get along with others. They are able to collaborate with their colleagues and are cooperative with the needs of their team and organization, showing adaptability and flexibility to change and openness to others' views. They care about and are willing to pitch in and help their colleagues. They can balance both team and individual priorities. Top performers cultivate positive relationships with coworkers and customers, actively participate, communicate constructively, and are consistent and reliable.

8. They have integrity.

Great performers have integrity, and as a result, can be trusted by their peers and superiors. They can be counted on to exhibit the highest degree of ethics and honesty. They communicate and act with sincerity and dependability, saying what they mean and meaning what they say and doing what they say they will do. People consider them to be genuine individuals with the right motives.

If you're trying to achieve great things at your organization, it's critically important to hire and keep top performers with these qualities. Once you have the right people on the bus, you'll find that your organization spends less time managing performance and more time enabling it, less time disciplining and more time developing, and less time creating and enforcing policies and more time building a culture that attracts and keeps the best people.

Additional Resources

NorthCoast 99
NorthCoast 99 is an annual recognition program that honors 99 great workplaces for top talent in Northeast Ohio. If your organization is interested in being recognized as a best place to work in 2012 and thinks it excels at attracting and retaining top performers, please click here to begin your application today and join us for a free informative program to kick off this year's application process. 

Benchmark Reports
Interested in targeted metrics for top performers and benchmarking how your organization's practices for attracting and retaining top talent compare to others in the region? Please take a look at our benchmark reports which provide tons of information on great workplaces and top performers.

Staffing & Recruitment Services
Looking for better ways to source and select top talent and help finding exceptional performers? Consider using ERC's consulting and assessment services. Additionally, our network of Preferred Partners provides several discounts and cost savings on staffing and recruitment services that can help your organization save money.

Healthy Employees: Staying "Heart Healthy"

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By Ron Todaro, RN, COHN-S

Cardiovascular diseases are conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and stroke. Some of these conditions, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, have no obvious symptoms, but some may have symptoms such as pain, confusion, swelling, or shortness of breath. It's important to know your risk factors for these cardiovascular conditions and what you can do to avoid a diagnosis or manage an existing condition.

Heart Disease Prevention: Managing Your Modifiable Risk Factors

Treatment of heart disease can be difficult. That’s why it's better to try to prevent these health conditions, particularly in people with known cardiovascular disease risks. But how do you prevent heart disease? How do you maintain good heart health?

It may seem simple, but for the most part, lifestyle plays a huge role in keeping the heart healthy and reducing cardiovascular disease risks. Many of these suggestions are probably familiar to most people. They include:

  • Managing your stress levels
  • Eating fruits, vegetables, and foods low in fat and cholesterol — maintaining a mostly plant-based diet
  • Becoming active (at least 30 minutes per day) and either maintaining your current weight or losing weight if you are overweight.
  • Monitoring your blood pressure. If it’s high, get it under control following your doctor’s guidelines.
  • Screening your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. If your numbers have increased, you may be able to reverse the trend.
  • Following treatment guidelines if you have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes

Eat right, exercise, don’t smoke, and talk to your doctor about any health concerns you have or any symptoms you notice. The earlier heart problems are detected, the better the chance you can begin treatment before any long-term damage has occurred.

Survey Shows National Salary Trends for HR Jobs

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According to the 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey, salaries rose modestly for HR professionals across the U.S. in 2011. The survey reports that HR Generalists showed the highest salary increase of 5% from 2011 and HR Assistants experienced the second highest salary increase of 4% from 2011.

Meanwhile, higher level HR professionals, such as Vice Presidents, Directors, and Managers showed more modest salary increases from 2011 of 1-2%.

The salaries for HR professionals reflected in this survey are consistent with other local and national compensation survey findings. In general, there has been less salary growth for many generalist-type HR functions in the years preceding 2012, as the data shows.  Nonetheless, national and local compensation surveys, including those conducted by ERC, continue to show that there has been more salary growth for specialist HR functions including compensation, training, organizational development, and staffing.

View ERC's Wage & Salary Adjustment Survey Results

The survey reports data from Northeast Ohio organizations regarding their actual and projected wage and salary adjustments.

View the Results

OSHA Summary Must be Posted By February 1

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As a reminder, OSHA rules require employers to post the OSHA 300 summary form of occupational injuries and illnesses occurring between January 1 and December 31, 2011 by no later than February 1. Employers, however, do not need to post the full log of workplace-related occupational injuries and illnesses.

Please note that the summary form needs to be completed even if no work-related injuries or illnesses were recorded and requires the certified signature of a company executive. Employers must keep the summary posted through April 30.

Employers can download these forms at the link below:
http://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/RKforms.html

5 Myths About Workplace Communication

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5 Myths About Workplace Communication

Employers constantly find themselves battling communication issues between employees and managers in the workplace. These issues commonly stem from not understanding the basics of good communication, mistaking frequency for quality, and making inaccurate assumptions about how much information others want and need to know. Here are 5 myths about workplace communication that your organization should consider "debunking" to improve communication.

1. If your employees are talking to you frequently, you have good communication.

Regular one-on-one "catch up" meetings between your employees and supervisors do not guarantee that quality communication is taking place. Despite these meetings, misunderstandings and communication breakdowns can still happen. Frequency of communication, while important, has little to do with how effective the communication between your supervisors and employees actually is. Focus instead of what is actually being discussed in those meetings and how it's being said.

2. Line employees are the main reason that communication suffers in the workplace.

Sometimes...but not usually. Effective communication is important at all levels of the organization, but is most important and more commonly expected at the manager level. After all, managers spend the majority of their time communicating with all levels of the organization, including other departments, employees, managers, and leaders. Their job is to make sure people have the information they need to do their jobs well and that they have the information necessary to manage their departments and employees. This involves sharing lots of information and asking lots of questions. As a result, when there is a communication problem, it usually falls on the manager.

3. An open-door policy is enough to encourage employees to share their concerns and ideas.

If you think that your organization's open-door policy is enough to encourage employees' sharing of opinions, ideas, and concerns, you're probably placing too much faith in your policy. Simply saying that your organization has an open-door policy does not necessarily ensure that employees will actually take advantage of this policy and voice their concerns to management. You will probably need to make more proactive attempts to gather employees' ideas and encourage their input if you value two-way communication with your staff.

4. Employees aren't interested in, privy to, or already know information.

This may be true for some of your employees, but not of all of them. Many employees desire more information about the organization and what it's trying to achieve, and your organization has a responsibility to share it with them. When employees are treated as partners in the business and given access to sensitive information, they are more likely to engage in their work and create greater value for your business. Additionally, never assume that employees already know something that is important for them to do their job. A good deal of communication problems result from assuming that people already know information they actually don't know.

5. Information is the foundation of good workplace communication.

Information is important, but trust and communication skills are the true foundations of good communication in the workplace, and both need to be developed over time. Trust is also one of the major reasons communication fails in the workplace. When departments don't trust other departments, employees don't trust their managers, and leaders don't trust employees, information gets withheld, decisions are made without consulting others, conflicts emerge, and everyone starts choosing their words less wisely and thoughtfully. Similarly, communication skills need to be built and fostered among all levels of your employees, and especially your managers, through training, coaching, and practice.

Communication issues affect every organization, but "debunking" common myths and assumptions about communication can be a good first step to improve communication in your organization and especially between your managers and employees.

Additional Resources

Supervisory Series
In this series, participants will gain an understanding of how to communicate effectively with others in the workplace, in addition to dealing with everyday challenges of being a supervisor, resolving workplace conflict, and managing performance and coaching. This series is offered in AM sessions and PM sessions and begins February 7th.

Communication & Interpersonal Skills TrainingERC specializes in communication, interpersonal, and soft-skills training for all levels of the organization. Click here to view the many training courses we offer. These courses can also be customized to meet the needs of your organization.  For more information, please contact ckutsko@yourerc.com.

Communication Skills Training

Compliance and Tracking are Key FMLA Challenges

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According to the 2012 ERC/CareWorks FMLA Practices Survey, Northeast Ohio employers face numerous challenges associated with administering employee leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The survey cites that the biggest challenges employers face when administering leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) are tracking leave, determining the overall costs associated with FMLA absences, and overall legal compliance. Determining what constitutes a serious health condition and meeting paperwork deadlines designated by the Department of Labor (DOL) were also cited as challenges, but were less common.

Additionally, 56% of respondents said they believe they are capturing all situations at their organization which should be designated as FMLA, further suggesting that several employers are experiencing challenges with tracking and administering the law.

"Employers spend a significant amount of time administering FMLA, but continue to struggle with compliance.  Every step of the FMLA administration process requires a substantial amount of detail, so an employer needs someone who is highly trained on the FMLA regulations and can stay on top of each claim on a daily basis," says Holly Moyer, Senior Disability Management Consultant at CareWorks. Holly adds, "The legal exposure for FMLA is on the rise, therefore it is critical for employers to have a well governed FMLA Administration program in place that focuses on compliance and consistent claim handling."

To download the full results of the survey, please click here. Or, to learn more about CareWorks and the services they can provide for ERC members as a Preferred Partner, please click here.

ERC Preferred Partner CareWorks provides Absence Management and FMLA Administration. ERC Members save 5% off per EE per month fee or a $500 discount off Initial Set-up Fee

Affirmative Action Planning Reminder

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Affirmative Action Plans (AAPs) are required of federal contractors annually if they have over 50 employees and have a federal contract of $50K or more.  AAPs can be complex and tedious. Many employers find that outsourcing their annual AAP is time saving and reduces a heck of a lot of headaches. If you are interested in outsourcing your AAP work, give ERC a call at 440-947-1278 or email us at hrhelp@yourerc.com.

Just Promoted to Supervisor? Here's What to Know About New Manager Training

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training for new managers supervisors New Supervisor New Manager Training

Every organization faces the challenge of new manager training: transitioning an employee from team player to team leader. This transition from employee to supervisor is one of the hardest an employee must make in their career. After the promotion occurs, what should you do to make sure the transition goes smoothly and that your new supervisor is successful in their new role?

One best practice is to approach the transition like you would on-board a new employee. Would you expect your new employee to learn by trial and error? Probably not. Like a new employee, anticipate that new supervisors need both initial and on-going training and support to perform their new role and responsibilities. Similar to on-boarding, the more you develop your employee upfront, the less redirection is needed later. Here are some suggestions.

1. Clarify expectations and priorities.

Most new supervisors have little clarity regarding what their priorities and expectations should be in their new role and aren't prepared to be effective in their new role. As a first step, spend time discussing their new responsibilities and performance expectations and how these have changed from their previous role.

2. Discuss your organization's management philosophy.

Every organization has management norms and a certain style of leadership that supports its culture, so it's important to discuss with your new supervisor how your organization expects employees to be managed. This helps ensure that employees are supervised consistently throughout the organization.

3. Schedule them for new manager training sooner than later.

Schedule employees for supervisory training as close to the time of promotion as possible or even prior to the transition, particularly for softer skills (i.e. communication, conflict management, etc.). Make sure new supervisors are set-up with the most critical baseline skills they need to be successful on the job. This will minimize common new supervisor mistakes.

4. Brief them on managerial procedures.

Administering a performance review, conducting a write-up, handling employee leave, or dealing with a grievance are just a few of many complicated issues in which your new supervisor has never been exposed. Make sure supervisors are knowledgeable about correct procedures to handle these issues and can access the proper paperwork and guidance.

5. Coach them on critical conversations.

Your supervisor will soon find themselves in tricky situations such as dealing with an underperforming employee, high-performing but dissatisfied employee, employee who comes to work late, or a team that isn't working together. These situations require difficult conversations and often require new manger training. Consider counseling and role-playing with them on the right and wrong things to say in these conversations and how to handle and mitigate common employee problems.

6. Provide time to interact with other managers.

One of the best ways for your new supervisor to learn the ropes of management is to spend time with other experienced managers and excellent leadership role models who can encourage and guide them, listen to their challenges and frustrations, and help them learn through their own experiences.

7. Encourage self-awareness.

It's unlikely that your newly promoted employee has ever considered how their interpersonal style helps or impedes their effectiveness. As soon as they start managing people, however, the quirks of their interpersonal styles (how they deal with conflict, their communication preferences, their personality, etc.) become apparent. Provide tools to help them become more aware of their style and behavior and flex it to meet others' needs and become a more effective manager.

8. Redirect their natural reflexes.

Every new supervisor experiences some natural reflexes—including the urge to do the work themselves and impose their ways of doing things on others without building consensus or asking for input. New supervisors will need to be encouraged to fight their natural reflexes to go back to the tactics that made them successful in their prior role.

9. Suggest resources.

Recommend books, tools, articles, blogs, job aids, and other tools for your new supervisor to access in order to become a better manager. Better yet, create a library of these resources at your organization. This will also help your other managers in their on-going management development.

10. Observe their transition to identify additional areas of development.

In their first few weeks and months on the job, observe how their transition is going. Specific issues to observe may include how much (or little) they are delegating, how they are interacting with their employees, and their team's performance. Talk to the new supervisor and employees on the supervisor's team to gather additional feedback. If you notice issues early on and correct them, it's unlikely that they will escalate.

You can never fully prepare managers for all of the challenges they will face, but by providing training, guidance, and support to supervisors before they hit the front-lines you can set them up to succeed as new leaders.

Interested in learning more about training your supervisors?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a video highlighting our process and a brochure featuring our courses, delivery methods, and success stories.

Preview Supervisory Training

 

2012 Compensation Surveys - Open for Participation

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Our 2012 Executive, Salary, & Wage Surveys are open for participation. These surveys collect compensation data on over 400 executive, director-level, administrative, professional, managerial, and hourly positions.

2012 ERC Salary Survey

This survey collects annual salary information from Northeast Ohio organizations for 279 administrative, professional, supervisory, and managerial positions in accounting, finance, administration, customer service, sales, engineering, human resources, IT, maintenance, marketing, production, purchasing/distribution, safety, science, and research and development functions. Salary data will be reported by number of employees, industry type, annual revenue, county, for-profit or non-profit status, and years of experience (including new hires) when the results are published in May.

To participate, visit http://www.yourerc.com/survey-data/participate/ and register as a first time user.

2012 ERC Wage Survey

This survey collects hourly pay information from Northeast Ohio organizations for 109 production, maintenance, warehouse, distribution, and transportation positions. Wage data will be reported by number of employees, industry type, annual revenue, county, union affiliation, and years of experience (including new hires) when the results are published in May.

To participate, visit http://www.yourerc.com/survey-data/participate/ and register as a first time user.

2012 EAA National Executive Compensation Survey

This survey collects salary, bonus/incentive, benefits, and perquisite information for 47 executive and director-level positions in general, finance, HR, engineering, sales/marketing, international, and non-profit functions as well as Board of Directors pay. Data will be reported by industry, organizational size, location (including Northeast Ohio), and sales volume when the results are published in June.

To participate, contact surveys@yourerc.com for a survey link to participate.

Members that participate in these surveys will receive the results for no cost when they are published in May/June of 2012. Non-members that participate in these surveys will receive the results at a discount.

Survey Shows Trends in FMLA Usage

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The ERC/CareWorks FMLA Practices Survey shows trends in FMLA usage. The majority of employers (71%) cite that between 1 and 10% of employees took FMLA in the last 12 months. Ninety percent of organizations reported that 20% or fewer employees took FMLA in the last 12 months.

The most common reasons in which employees take FMLA are due to pregnancy/maternity leave or an acute/chronic serious health condition. Fewer employees take FMLA to care for a family member or deal with a catastrophic event.

The survey also indicates that few FMLA claims are typically denied by employers. Sixty-nine percent of employers report that they did not deny any claims in the last 12 months and only 26% say they denied fewer than 10% of claims.

To download the full results of the survey, please click here and for a short summary of the results, please click here. Or, to learn more about CareWorks and the services they can provide for ERC members as a Preferred Partner, please click here.