7 Strategies to Find Extraordinary Local Talent

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Is your organization looking for extraordinary talent and thinks it needs to search outside of your local community? Not so fast. Many employers think they can't find talent locally and pursue their search elsewhere, but local talent is at your fingertips if you use the right strategies.

Using local job boards, postings, and advertisements (either print or online) is a good start.  These days, however, employers need to go a few steps further to find the very best talent, including building strong local roots.

Here are some proven strategies used by other local employers to consider in your quest to find and hire exceptional local talent.

  1. Pay attention to and learn about local talent in the region. Read local publications and news. Learn about the successes of other companies and the individuals employed at those organizations.  Take notice of individuals gaining attention in the local media, those receiving industry recognition and awards, and those that contribute the community in their field of expertise.
  2. Develop a presence on social media. Join local groups on LinkedIn, follow local talent on Twitter, read their blogs, and/or create a Facebook page. There are so many ways to leverage these platforms to find talent. For instance, monitor key influencers and those people contributing quality questions and content.
  3. Participate in the community. Get involved in local chambers of commerce. Go to conference and community events held around your community. Join local chapters of professional associations.  Seek and attend speaking engagements. Do community service, participate on boards, and help our non-profits. Use local resources for leadership and employee development. Meet a diverse group of people, network, and learn who the key players are in your community.
  4. Connect with local colleges, universities, and vocational schools. Develop strong relationships with professors and career centers at those institutions. Pursue speaking engagements at colleges so that students are exposed to your company and its leaders.  Use alumni relations to stay in touch. Create internships and entry-level opportunities to keep young talent here for the future of the region.
  5. Encourage your employees to be active in their communities and engage in local professional groups for their personal development. They'll engage and network with others and potentially refer them to your organization for employment. Plus, they'll likely gain valuable professional skills in the process.
  6. Partner with local talent search providers and staffing organizations. There are plenty of them with unique expertise. Plus, they often have the best knowledge of the local labor market and how your organization can find great local people. Who better to trust in finding a local hire than a local staffing provider?
  7. Boost your local workplace intelligence. Know what other local employers are paying for certain talent and jobs. Understand the kinds of benefits and perks they offer to employees. Explore ways that other local organizations are creating attractive and engaging workplaces that keep great talent.

Finding local talent isn't easy, but if your organization is committed to hiring good people, it's worth the effort. Next time your organization is considering looking outside of Northeast Ohio for a great hire and thinks that certain talent doesn't exist in our region, try these strategies before taking your search elsewhere.

Additional Resources

NorthCoast 99
Get recognized as a great place to work in 2012 to help your organization better attract and retain top talent in Northeast Ohio by participating in our NorthCoast 99 program. Click here for more information.

Staffing Services
ERC partners with several local organizations dedicated to staffing, recruiting, and hiring talent. Our Preferred Partners provide various staffing services to ERC members at discount rates. Learn more

Survey Information
Use ERC's compensation, benefits, and policy/practice information to determine the pay, benefits, and practices other local employers use to attract and retain great talent. Click here for more information about our surveys.

Why You Can't Find the Right Hire

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Many employers are facing what is perceived to be a “talent shortage” – many applicants, but few qualified candidates. Even though this perceived talent shortage may be real, here are some other reasons why your organization may not be able to find the right hire.

You have too many job requirements.

Making your qualification requirements too detailed and specific can narrow your applicant pool and doesn’t necessarily ensure that you’ll hire a top performer. Many employers make the mistake of assuming that more experience, education, and specific skills mean a better performer, but fit and personality factors should also play a role. Requesting too many requirements could eliminate candidates that can do the job well and have growth potential. A classic example of individuals affected by narrow job requirements are recent college graduates, who may not necessarily have the skills or experience you are requiring, but may be top performers.

You have misconceptions about unemployed, disabled, and older workers.

Consider whether your organization is inadvertently discriminating against the unemployed, disabled, older workers by acting on misconceptions that these types of individuals are worse performers or less-than-ideal employees. Being unemployed, disabled, or older should not automatically eliminate applicants from being considered for employment. Not only will these misconceptions limit your applicant pool and cause you to miss a potential great hire, but they could eventually lead you to court. Plus, there are a number of successful companies that have tapped into these applicant pools and found top-quality hires.

Your sourcing is too limited.

If your organization is relying solely on job board postings to acquire talent, its sourcing strategy is probably too narrow and thereby ineffective. While job boards are still a common source used by employers to source talent, organizations need to tap both active and passive job candidates – those that are actively seeking new employment and those that are open to new job opportunities but aren’t actively searching. Many employers have turned to social media, networking, and “niche” recruiting to attract specialized talent and tap into these passive candidates.

You aren’t using your network.

A network is, by far, the best way to attract quality hires. Tap into your entire organizational network – including employees, customers, professional connections and relationships – for their recommendations on potential candidates.  They are usually thrilled to help and provide meaningful suggestions. Plus, referrals are one of the most effective ways to attract quality hires and are one of the least expensive sourcing strategies.

You aren’t willing to train and develop the skills you need.

It’s much easier to find an individual that has the ability and desire to learn then it is to find an employee with every skill you need, especially for hard-to-fill technical positions. Consider whether your organization is open to training and developing some of the skills you need but can't find. This option may save you significant time and recruiting costs and allows you to focus on less trainable attributes like culture fit during the hiring process.

Your candidate experience could improve.

Once you’ve found a qualified candidate, how does your organization treat and follow-up with them throughout the hiring process? Chances are, your responsiveness, flexibility, and communication with potential job candidates could improve. Remember that job candidates are just like customers and employees. They’re evaluating your organization and will tell others about their experiences. Make sure those experiences are positive.

You may not be setting your organization apart from the rest.

Finally, has your organization revealed to its applicants how it is it different from other companies? Perhaps it offers stability or advancement opportunities that other employers can’t provide. Maybe it is growing rapidly, has a unique family-friendly culture, or was recognized as a great place to work nationally or regionally. If you don’t talk about your strengths or promote why your organization is a great place to work, applicants won’t know what they are missing by not accepting a job at your organization. Gaining recognition as a great place to work, such as through the NorthCoast 99 program (www.northcoast99.org), and leveraging this to attract applicants, can boost your organization’s reputation and is often the best place to start when it comes to improving your ability to attract talent. It also shows that you care about being an employer of choice and strive to be a good workplace.

Talented employees are undoubtedly a sought-after commodity, but many employers have found that these strategies help them attract the very best talent. If your organization is facing its own “talent shortage,” keep these suggestions in mind.


For more information on how to earn recognition as a NorthCoast 99 winner and one of the best places to work in Northeast Ohio please visit www.northcoast99.org

Skilled Manufacturing Jobs See Higher Salary Increases than Unskilled

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Pay for skilled manufacturing jobs seems to be rising, according to a 2012 national survey released by ERC. Based on the 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey, several skilled manufacturing jobs (namely supervision) saw higher salary increases than unskilled manufacturing jobs.

Median Salaries for Production Supervisors

 

2011

2012

% Change

Production Supervisor - Unskilled Operation

$50,447

$47,649

-6%

Production Supervisor - Semi-skilled Operation

$53,053

$54,485

3%

Production Supervisor - Skilled Operation

$57,842

$60,982

5%

Trades Supervisor - Production Support

$68,332

$70,184

3%

Source: 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey

The survey reports a decrease in median salary from 2011 for production supervisors of unskilled operations, yet positive increases in median salaries from 2011 for production supervisors of semi-skilled, skilled, and trade operations. In fact, these increases were above the average salary increase of 2.8% in 2011. Employers reported the highest percentage increase (5%) in median salary for production supervisors of skilled operations.

Other data in the survey shows that several unskilled manufacturing jobs, including production workers and laborers, reported modest if any salary increases from 2011. These findings are consistent with local pay trends which show relatively stagnant wages for some manufacturing jobs, particularly unskilled ones.

The findings of this survey are consistent with other local and national trends we've seen, suggesting that skilled manufacturing jobs are in high demand and pay is beginning to reflect this demand. Pay is often a factor influencing retention for employees in the manufacturing sector, so providing above-average or competitive pay rates for manufacturing jobs will be crucial for employers seeking to attract and retain highly skilled manufacturing workers.

View ERC's Wage & Salary Adjustment Survey Results

The survey reports data from Northeast Ohio organizations regarding their actual and projected wage and salary adjustments.

View the Results

How to Pay Your Executives

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Executive pay is very different from other compensation practices you administer, involving greater pay-mix complexity, more components, and consideration of various business and legal factors. Here are executive compensation basics that you need to know to drive your business results as well as attract and retain key executive talent.

Create an executive compensation philosophy

Establishing and communicating a formal compensation philosophy for executives is an important part of an executive compensation program. This philosophy should clearly explain the principles on which executive compensation decisions are based and how executive pay programs are driving the organization's needs and strategic goals (Lupo, 2010). Comprehensive documentation of rationale supporting your organization's executive compensation programs is also an important part of your program. Additionally, this philosophy may define who qualifies for executive compensation (typically only the highest paid executives).

Invest time in executive compensation program design

Executive compensation should start with your business's goals and objectives. Define what the strategic objectives of the business are, how the company will define success in 3-5 years, the kind of talent needed to support its business strategy, and how long you want to retain the talent. This strategy will help your organization make decisions on the other elements of executive compensation design including pay mix, performance measures, and pay position relative to the market (Hosken & Laddin, 2011).

Additionally, identify taxes, governmental regulations, and industry trends that affect executives' compensation. All of these issues should play a role in how and what you decide to pay your leaders.

Gather executive compensation market data

Many organizations use market data to establish executive compensation. Choose surveys that are similar in revenue size and industry and whose participants reflect your peer group. Peer groups may be those companies similar in revenue, market, number of employees, or performance. Peer groups could also be companies that you compete with in your industry or for executive talent.

In addition to salary surveys, ERI is a strong data source to use for executive compensation decisions and contains specialized industry data. ERI's data meets expert witness reliability standards and is cited in Sarbanes-Oxley proxy disclosures as a data source used to determine executive compensation. Plus, ERI is relied upon by many private corporations smaller in size. You can also compare your positions to data from the most relevant or comparable public firms using proxy statements.

If your organization is a small to medium sized private company, however, be cautious when comparing your executives' compensation, benefits, and perquisites to only readily available information about public company executives. Only a small percentage of U.S. companies are public and these figures are usually much larger than what executives actually earn at similarly sized organizations (Chief Executive, 2011). For example, in one of our latest surveys, a CEO's median base salary was reported at $203,000 and median bonus was reported at $63,200, which are far lower than figures for much larger public organizations.

Benchmark types of executive compensation pay

Typically five types of pay should be benchmarked to obtain a true picture of how executives should be paid. These include base salary, short-term incentives, long-term incentives, perquisites, and benefits. As a result, a solid survey or source of compensation data should include at least the following information: base salaries, bonuses, total compensation, benefits, and perquisites.  Most organizations that we serve use bonuses (tied to organizational profitability/performance and individual performance) and base salaries for executive compensation.

When analyzing pay, revenue is usually the most common factor used to determine executive compensation because executive pay is directly related to size and revenue of an organization. Using industry can also be helpful, but look first at the revenue breakout. If the survey is smaller in scope, be sure to look at broader industry definitions for the most reliable results. These breakouts will tend to have more data.

Anticipate executive salary increases

Currently, executive salary increases and adjustments have been projected lower than past years. Traditionally, executive increases hovered around 4%, however, most surveys - including those conducted by Mercer, WorldatWork, and ERC show that executives can expect increases of around 3% in 2012. These projected increases, however, are slightly higher than the 2.8-2.9% increases seen since 2009, but do vary according to the position.

Keep in mind that making pay decisions (such as increases) for executives involves considering how those decisions will impact your organization's costs down the road.  A 4% increase for an executive translates to a much larger cost than a 4% increase for a factory employee.

These are just some of the basics of executive compensation that you can use to help determine how and what to pay your leaders. Keep in mind that managing executive pay can be very complicated, depending on your business, objectives, needs and peer group, so be sure to seek expertise in this area or credible market data on executive compensation practices to help you make good business decisions.

Additional Resources

ERC Membership

Members of ERC receive access to national and local salary, pay, and benefits survey data in addition the ERI's Salary Assessor and global pay information accessible through our HR Help Desk (hrhelp@yourerc.com). More info

Compensation Consulting

Our compensation consulting services cover a broad range of assistance on the total rewards spectrum, from basic job description updates to the complete design of organization-wide base salary compensation systems, executive compensation, and variable pay programs. For more information, click here.

Sources:

  • Hosken, E. & Laddin, D. (2011). Best Practices for Executive Compensation. WorldatWork Workspan.
  • Lupo, P. (2010). Top 10 Considerations for Establishing an Executive Compensation Philosophy. Pearl Meyer & Partners.
  • ChiefExecutive.net (2011). Media Wrong About CEO Compensation.

ERC Announces New International HR Resources for Members

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In 2012, ERC surveyed our members on their need for International HR resources and support. Due to our members’ growth of international operations and questions about how to manage employees outside the U.S., ERC is excited to announce the addition of several new global HR resources available to ERC members through our HR Help Desk. 

Supported by tools and resources including the BNA International HR Support Network, the Mercer International Geographic Salary Differential report, and Mercer Global Pay Summary Survey, ERC members can now receive guidance on questions regarding HR policies and practices in other countries, compensation data, employment law, and managing global employees or assignments. 

If you have an International HR question, contact our HR Help Desk at 440/947-1278 or hrhelp@yourerc.com.

7 Common Compensation Questions

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Types of sources to use, frequency of market studies, handling employee questions about fairness, etc. -  these are just a few of many compensation issues and questions that you face every day. We've compiled answers to some of the most frequently asked questions we receive related to compensation.

What sources do most employers use to benchmark compensation?

Most employers use more than one salary data source to make compensation decisions. Common choices of salary data sources include Mercer, Willis Towers Watson, Kenexa, CompAnalyst, ERI, and Aon Hewitt. Local, state, and industry-specific surveys are also used, particularly in organizations with fewer than 200 employees.

How frequently should we be formally reviewing compensation?

The best practice is at least every two years; however, if your organization has made a number of changes to jobs, has fallen behind on benchmarking pay in the past few years, is competing for hard-to-find talent, or is focused on retaining above average talent, then it may consider benchmarking compensation more frequently. In these cases, we suggest an annual review. Although you may only formally review compensation every other year, it's important to at least stay abreast of the latest compensation trends each year and review key positions. You need to make sure that your key players' pay is in line with the market at all times.

What's the future outlook for compensation?

Salary increase budgets in the U.S. are expected to remain at about 3%, consistent with many past years.  However, the rate of pay acceleration has in the market has increased dramatically which makes the need to watch for market related changes in pay that much more important. 

How do the rising costs of benefits play into compensation decisions?

Some employers have questions about how the rising costs of health care and other benefits play into decisions about compensation. Benefits and health care costs have become a larger component of the total compensation package offered to employees, so it's more important than ever before that employers are looking at total compensation in addition to base pay in order to make appropriate pay decisions. There's also no question that rising benefits costs and uncertainty about the Affordable Health Care Act will likely be a consideration in overall costs.  That's why it's important to review benefits and pay data annually to make sure you're in line with the market on both. This will provide you more insight on what changes you need to make in terms of cost-sharing, benefits contributions, and pay increases.

How should I evaluate compensation data?

There are a few key things to look for when evaluating compensation survey data. First, you will want to make certain you utilize credible, employer reported data from robust and reliable sources. Second, you'll want to research who participated in the survey and what geographic region the survey represents. Third, make sure you also know when the survey data is effective so that you make appropriate aging adjustments to ensure that you are comparing data according to consistent time periods. Fourth, look at participation in the survey, specifically the number of employers participating for each breakout reported. Breakouts which have statistically significant participation are more reliable than breakouts with limited reporting.  That's why you may see less reliable salary trends in positions that have less participation.

What should we do if we find that pay isn't in line with the market?

Nothing or something -- it all depends on your compensation philosophy, what the position is, which employee is in the position, and your ability to make the change. If the employee is a solid performer, your philosophy is to pay at or above market, and the position is valuable to your organization, you should consider a phased approach to adjusting an employee's pay to market-competitive levels. If the employee is a bottom performer and their position isn't valued, sometimes it's okay to do nothing. As an employer, you don't have to make pay adjustments unless you feel they are warranted and worthwhile.

One of my employees thinks their pay is unfair, what should I do?

Employees often question the competitiveness and fairness of their compensation and how they are paid relative to employees in similar roles at other organizations. Let's just say that pay is never a workplace issue with which employees are most satisfied. This often stems from lack of transparency with regard to compensation administration and the proliferation of unreliable, employee-reported pay data available online. Nonetheless, there are a number of things you can do to make sure employees are aware of the steps your organization takes to keep compensation competitive and to make sure the process is as transparent as possible.

  • Do your homework. Conduct market studies to see how employees' pay stacks up to other organizations.
  • Create and communicate a compensation philosophy or policy about how your organization intends to pay employees relative to the market. Most importantly, make sure employees understand it.
  • Explain the salary survey sources you use to benchmark compensation.
  • Show employees how you pay them relative to the market, such as actual market or survey data.
  • Communicate the process by which your organization makes compensation decisions as transparently as possible. It will make the process seem less mysterious and secretive.
  • Provide total compensation or rewards statements. Employees often don't realize how much they are earning in benefits and other perks your organization provides and these figures usually surprise them.

It's important to note that even despite your organization's best efforts to be transparent, there will always be a number of employees who aren't satisfied with their pay. This is natural and common and isn't anything to be concerned about provided your programs and administration are legally compliant and you are attracting and retaining top talent.

 

Compensation & Benefits Consulting

Compensation & Benefits Consulting

ERC offers a variety of compensation and benefits consulting services including competitive market pay analysis, salary structure design, total rewards strategy, variable pay design, and more!

Get Started Today

Training Salaries on the Rise

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According to the 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey, salaries for training professionals rose from 2011. In particular, the median salary for Training Specialist I showed the highest increase of 8% from 2011 when compared with other training jobs surveyed. Similarly, the median salary for Training Managers saw an above average increase of 5%.

The data reported in this survey seems consistent with other salary trends reported by the American Society of Training & Development (ASTD) indicating that compensation for training, learning, and development professionals' exceeds the average U.S. income of $46,000 and that the majority of learning and development professionals received a pay raise within the past year.

These trends could suggest increasing demand for training and development professionals nationwide as organizations  continue to expand their training practices and enhance their learning and development activities.

For more information about the 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey or to purchase it, please click here.

The 8 Defining Qualities of Top Talent

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Over the years, ERC has researched what distinguishes a top performer from an average performer based on employers' perspectives. The results are strikingly consistent across industries and sizes. Regardless of the organization type, most employers define top performers very similarly and are looking for the same types of characteristics and behaviors in their employees.

What makes top talent different from average talent? Typically, these eight key qualities. 

1. They achieve results.

Top performers consistently achieve results and make positive contributions to their organizations. They "wow" customers, produce quality work, improve productivity, make good decisions, and model the right behaviors that lead to their success. They remain committed to excelling at their work despite challenges, and try different ideas and strategies to improve their results.

2. They're a go-to person.

Top performers are sought-after employees in the organization - not only because of their impressive knowledge and talents, but because they are easy to work with and dependable. They tend to be well-respected and valued by others in the organization for their abilities, insights, and perhaps creativity. They are often technical and functional experts that others can rely on to do the work well. They know their stuff and have a good reputation. They help other employees solve their problems.

3. They go above and beyond.

This is the classic differentiator of a top performer. Top talent do more than is expected and required in small and large ways. They seek opportunities to expand their responsibilities, challenge and develop themselves, and go above and beyond their jobs and to meet others' needs - including those of their coworkers and customers. They also typically perform above goals and standards.

4. They take initiative.

Top performers don't wait for someone to tell them to do a task. They begin new assignments before they are told, look for work to fill spare time, explore ways to solve problems or challenges, see new opportunities, volunteer for extra tasks, and can work well with little supervision.  They anticipate what needs to be done and make suggestions for how to add value, do things better, and work more efficiently. They act like a leader even when it may not be their job.

5. They're self-motivated.

Top performers usually don't need to be motivated in order to get the job done and done well. Their motivation is self-driven. They know their passions, interests, and priorities and pursue work that aligns with those. They typically have a purpose, set their goals high, and are persistent in reaching them. Their self-motivation fuels lifelong learning and development. They don't need to be told to develop skills because they usually are already taking steps to make themselves more valuable to the organization.

6. They think big-picture.

Unlike average performers, you can count on top performers to "get it." They strive to understand the organization's direction and goals and think beyond their immediate job. They may suggest enhancements to other areas of the organization, help coworkers or other departments, and align their personal objectives and priorities with those of the organization. They display an interest in helping the organization move forward and ask for opportunities to impact the organization.

7. They are a team player.

Top performers get along with others. They are able to collaborate with their colleagues and are cooperative with the needs of their team and organization, showing adaptability and flexibility to change and openness to others' views. They care about and are willing to pitch in and help their colleagues. They can balance both team and individual priorities. Top performers cultivate positive relationships with coworkers and customers, actively participate, communicate constructively, and are consistent and reliable.

8. They have integrity.

Great performers have integrity, and as a result, can be trusted by their peers and superiors. They can be counted on to exhibit the highest degree of ethics and honesty. They communicate and act with sincerity and dependability, saying what they mean and meaning what they say and doing what they say they will do. People consider them to be genuine individuals with the right motives.

If you're trying to achieve great things at your organization, it's critically important to hire and keep top performers with these qualities. Once you have the right people on the bus, you'll find that your organization spends less time managing performance and more time enabling it, less time disciplining and more time developing, and less time creating and enforcing policies and more time building a culture that attracts and keeps the best people.

Additional Resources

NorthCoast 99
NorthCoast 99 is an annual recognition program that honors 99 great workplaces for top talent in Northeast Ohio. If your organization is interested in being recognized as a best place to work in 2012 and thinks it excels at attracting and retaining top performers, please click here to begin your application today and join us for a free informative program to kick off this year's application process. 

Benchmark Reports
Interested in targeted metrics for top performers and benchmarking how your organization's practices for attracting and retaining top talent compare to others in the region? Please take a look at our benchmark reports which provide tons of information on great workplaces and top performers.

Staffing & Recruitment Services
Looking for better ways to source and select top talent and help finding exceptional performers? Consider using ERC's consulting and assessment services. Additionally, our network of Preferred Partners provides several discounts and cost savings on staffing and recruitment services that can help your organization save money.

Healthy Employees: Staying "Heart Healthy"

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By Ron Todaro, RN, COHN-S

Cardiovascular diseases are conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and stroke. Some of these conditions, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, have no obvious symptoms, but some may have symptoms such as pain, confusion, swelling, or shortness of breath. It's important to know your risk factors for these cardiovascular conditions and what you can do to avoid a diagnosis or manage an existing condition.

Heart Disease Prevention: Managing Your Modifiable Risk Factors

Treatment of heart disease can be difficult. That’s why it's better to try to prevent these health conditions, particularly in people with known cardiovascular disease risks. But how do you prevent heart disease? How do you maintain good heart health?

It may seem simple, but for the most part, lifestyle plays a huge role in keeping the heart healthy and reducing cardiovascular disease risks. Many of these suggestions are probably familiar to most people. They include:

  • Managing your stress levels
  • Eating fruits, vegetables, and foods low in fat and cholesterol — maintaining a mostly plant-based diet
  • Becoming active (at least 30 minutes per day) and either maintaining your current weight or losing weight if you are overweight.
  • Monitoring your blood pressure. If it’s high, get it under control following your doctor’s guidelines.
  • Screening your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. If your numbers have increased, you may be able to reverse the trend.
  • Following treatment guidelines if you have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes

Eat right, exercise, don’t smoke, and talk to your doctor about any health concerns you have or any symptoms you notice. The earlier heart problems are detected, the better the chance you can begin treatment before any long-term damage has occurred.

Survey Shows National Salary Trends for HR Jobs

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According to the 2012 EAA National Wage & Salary Survey, salaries rose modestly for HR professionals across the U.S. in 2011. The survey reports that HR Generalists showed the highest salary increase of 5% from 2011 and HR Assistants experienced the second highest salary increase of 4% from 2011.

Meanwhile, higher level HR professionals, such as Vice Presidents, Directors, and Managers showed more modest salary increases from 2011 of 1-2%.

The salaries for HR professionals reflected in this survey are consistent with other local and national compensation survey findings. In general, there has been less salary growth for many generalist-type HR functions in the years preceding 2012, as the data shows.  Nonetheless, national and local compensation surveys, including those conducted by ERC, continue to show that there has been more salary growth for specialist HR functions including compensation, training, organizational development, and staffing.

View ERC's Wage & Salary Adjustment Survey Results

The survey reports data from Northeast Ohio organizations regarding their actual and projected wage and salary adjustments.

View the Results