Are You Wage-Fixing? Discussing Compensation With HR Friends Could Put You in Hot Water

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

Talking To Industry Friends: Are You Saying Too Much?

We all do it with our counterparts in the industry…we share stories about that uncomfortable discussion that we had to have with an employee, ask our friends how they have handled sensitive situations, and grumble about our never-ending to-do list. However, are you also talking  to people at other organizations about employee salaries? Are hiring or compensation conversations coming up during networking events?  Remember that these discussions could land you in hot water!
Read this article...

4 Steps to Managing Absenteeism in Your Organization

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

4 Steps to Managing Absenteeism in Your Organization

Life is full of surprises, ones that sometimes lead to employees calling off work unexpectedly. Whether it is a last-minute cancellation by a childcare provider, a case of food poisoning, or another more “creative” reason, absenteeism is a pervasive and costly issues faced by organizations across the board. The four steps outlined below can serve as a basic guide on improving your absence management practices this year.
Read this article...

8 Reasons to Pay Your Interns This Summer

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

8 Reasons to Pay Your Interns This Summer

With so much focus on the impending changes to the FLSA overtime rules, it is important not to lose sight of the existing regulations and keep your organization in compliance with other areas of the law that sets the standards for so many areas of employee compensation practices. One area that is (fairly) straightforward per the existing FLSA regulations and is top of mind for many employers as we head towards the summer months is, of course, interns.
Read this article...

5 Ways to Keep Your New Year’s Resolution (and Wellness Program) on Track

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

5 Ways to Keep Your New Year’s Resolution (and Wellness Program) on Track

One week into a new year and you are probably already sick and tired of hearing about the latest diet trend or exercise regimen that is “guaranteed” to make your New Year’s resolution to “get healthy” stick this time around.

Most medical professionals will tell you that (unfortunately) there is no silver bullet to a “healthier you”, and as it turns out, a good old fashioned healthy diet and consistent exercise routine tends to be just what the doctor ordered.

So what does all this talk about New Year’s resolutions have to do with HR and building great workplaces here in Northeast Ohio?

Well according to ERC’s 2015 Wellness Practices Survey, at three-quarters of local organizations, the connection is their formal wellness program. Take the analogy one step further, and you’ll quickly discover that wellness programs often suffer from the same plight as New Year’s resolutions—the best of intentions, but lacking in follow-through when it comes time for implementation. Despite becoming an almost standard benefit at many employers over the last several years, some wellness programs and individual wellness focused activities are now suffering from a lack of participation and interest on the part of the employees.

In fact participants in both the 2013 and 2015 ERC Wellness Surveys cited “effectively educating and incentivizing employees to participate in wellness programs” as the most common barrier to creating a successful wellness program at their organization.

To help both employers and employees make the most of what can be and should be an important piece of overall employee wellbeing, participating organizations in ERC’s Wellness Surveys offered the following advice on creating (or reinvigorating) a successful wellness program.

1. Offer wellness activities/programs that employees find useful.

This particular struggle is most easily addressed if met head-on at the program’s inception and can be as simple as a survey of employee’s interests in a list of potential activities under consideration. Understanding the basic demographics of your workforce can also help inform what types of programs make the cut. Gender, age, shift work (who will actually be around if you are offering programs on-site during the day), etc. are all useful statistics to consider, but don’t get too overzealous and start trying to dig into specific health related needs—HIPPA can get messy quickly.

By starting out with wellness activities that employees want to take part in, you are already ahead of the curve.

But don’t worry if you already have a program in place, it’s not too late to start taking your employee’s interests into account. In fact, a quick survey of your employees every couple of years to make sure the programming is still relevant isn’t a bad idea either.

2. Make the programming accessible—both geographically and intellectually.

If your organization is on the larger side or draws employees from a diverse geographic footprint, make sure the activities are easily accessible to as many individual employees as possible. Your employees are probably juggling a family life, the stress of work, and any number of other time intensive activities.

In short, their time is valuable, so partnering with a gym with only one location far on one side of town may not see the best results. Instead, consider offering reimbursement for a gym of the employee’s choosing or make the investment in an on-site gym or fitness classes.

Online programming can be an easy option, but make sure it is providing useful information that isn’t too overwhelming or too basic. One the one hand if the online articles, tracking mechanism, or lectures are overly technical and scientific employees might be turned off, but by the same token presenting overly simplistic information won’t do your employees any good either.

3. Use the resources you already have.

Many health insurance packages include an array of free resources that you the employer can pass along to your employees. All you have to do as the employer is promote them. But that is sometimes easier said than done—now someone has to be tasked with sending out the email reminders or monthly newsletters to help get employees on board. If financial resources are not available to create a new position (e.g. Wellness Coordinator) delegation or committee work can be helpful in prevent overloading a single individual with wellness related administrative tasks. Of course if all else fails, and you are determined to create a robust, successful wellness program, just ask for help. You may find that you have a multi-talented staff that is more than willing to share their kick-boxing expertise or vegan baking skills with their co-workers.

4. Get full buy-in on all levels.

As with most new initiatives, it is critical to get the full support of the top management team. Buy-in from the top can definitely be helpful when budget season rolls around, but when it comes to wellness programs, a more visible buy-in can be hugely helpful as well. Having the CEO out there trying to get to his or her 10,000 steps during lunch can be a great motivator and even a fun way for employees to interact casually with other employees that they may not typically encounter on a day-to-day basis. And of course keep in mind that the importance of buy-in goes beyond these specific activities to the bigger picture of what you are trying to achieve with your wellness program. If your end goal is to fully indoctrinate your organization with a culture of wellness, engaging employees at all levels is particularly important.

5. Incentivize, when you can.

Even with all the struggles and barriers to participation discussed above, many organizations are running very successful wellness programs. If better health isn’t enough of a motivator, money is bound to do the trick. Keep in mind that there are specific limitations as to how much and how the monies are distributed for each individual and for different types of activities. Cost can also be a strong disincentive against certain behaviors, most notably tobacco usage. The Affordable Care Act provides a detailed breakdown of allowable incentives and disincentives should you choose to go down the path of incentivizing your wellness program. If you aren’t quite ready for the monetary commitment, remember that food or other small non-monetary incentives can help improve the effectiveness of your programming by bolstering attendance at lectures or participation in fitness challenges.

Much like the New Year’s resolution you made a week ago, setting your organization’s wellness program up for success can seem overwhelming. But with the help of the advice above and a little extra hard work and perseverance in 2016, you too can get to the gym 4 days a week and get your employees to show up for the nutritionist you’ve booked for that lunch-n-learn next month.

View ERC's Wellness Practices Survey Results

This report summarizes the results of ERC’s survey of organizations in Northeast Ohio, conducted in September of 2015, on practices related to health care and wellness.

View the Results

What Are Employers Doing to Manage Health Care Costs?

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

What Are Employers Doing to Manage Health Care Costs managing healthcare costs health care cost management

According to the 2015 ERC Wellness Practices Survey both the average percent premium increase and the average annual spend on health insurance premiums have declined since the 2013 survey.

This slight downward trend is certainly not the case at every organization and did not occur without significant cost management efforts on the part of both employer and employees. Of course there are variables that no one can control, i.e. unexpected serious illness, aging employee population, etc., but this year’s survey results help illuminate which tactics employers are using (or not using) most effectively to help push the variables that are in their control in the right direction.
Read this article...

What are the Hardest Positions to Fill in Northeast Ohio?

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

A majority of Northeast Ohio organizations are planning to grow their businesses this year. Hiring projections from the 2015 ERC Hiring Trends & Practices Survey show that 84% of participating organizations have already hired one or more employees in 2015, and plan to make additional hires. Only 4% do not plan on hiring any employees this year. The 2015 ERC Hiring Trends and Practices Survey highlights hiring practices of 102 participating employers. 

While business growth is a top priority for these organizations, hiring and retaining top talent is also cited as the biggest challenge faced by NE Ohio employers. Specifically, employers report the following positions as the most challenging to fill:

Top Hard-to-Fill Positions in Northeast Ohio
Read this article...

Upcoming National Holidays Largely Overlooked In Northeast Ohio

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

If you happen to have the day off on January 21, consider yourself lucky. Here in Northeast Ohio the percentage of organizations observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a paid holiday has consistently fallen well below the national average and 2013 is no different. According to the 2013 ERC Paid Holiday Survey only 11% of the 202 participating organizations include Martin Luther King Jr. Day in their paid holiday allocation. This falls 21 percentage points below the national statistics recently reported by BNA.

Where the two surveys do see eye-to-eye, is in terms of the clear industry specific differences seen between the types of organizations that offer Martin Luther King Jr. Day and those that do not. For example, the BNA survey reports that manufacturers are by far the least likely to give the day off at 7% and non-business (i.e. non-profits/government) organizations are the most likely to give the day off at 56%. The ERC survey saw a similarly wide discrepancy between manufacturers and non-profit (i.e. non-business) with non-manufacturing employers falling somewhere in between the two extremes.

These industry specific variations are particularly noteworthy as they may be responsible for at least some of the discrepancy observed between the overall averages reported by the national and local surveys. In terms of the demographics represented by each survey sample, the national BNA survey included primarily non-manufacturing organizations, while over half of ERC’s local survey respondents represented manufacturing organizations. While this over-representation of manufacturers and non-profits in the local and national surveys, respectively, accounts for some of the discrepancy, the fact remains that Northeast Ohio employers are observing Martin Luther King Jr. Day at a lower rate than the national average.

Looking  ahead to February, President’s Day will be observed as a paid holiday by even fewer Northeast Ohio organizations, only 8%. Industry specific differences are slightly less prominent as the overall percentage of organizations offering the day off are lower, but a similar trend can be seen with manufacturers once again ranking last out of the three industry breakouts reported.

For more information on how many and which paid holidays Northeast Ohio employers are offering their employees in 2013, download the entire 2013 ERC Paid Holiday Survey free of charge.

Non-Profit Salary and Benefits Data Published

Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Plus Share this Page

In collaboration with United Way of Greater Cleveland, ERC is pleased to announce the publication of the 2012 Non-Profit and Health & Human Services Compensation and Benefits survey results. By drawing upon both United Way’s strength as a preeminent organization in the non-profit community as well as ERC’s reputation as Northeast Ohio’s leading publisher of local workplace information and salary data, these surveys provide current and reliable compensation and benefits benchmarks to non-profits across the region.
Read this article...