5 Tips for Engaging Tenured Employees

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5 Tips for Engaging Tenured Employees

For many managers or HR professionals, they’ve encountered an entitled tenured employee once or twice in their career. You know, the employee who thinks because they were a top performer in 2007 that they can slack off and still reap the benefits as someone producing twice the results but is half their age. Just because they have company “loyalty.”
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The Ultimate Guide to Training in 2015

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hr training topics The Ultimate Guide to Training in 2015

If your organization is like most, a guiding question for your 2015 planning will likely be some version of this question: “What kinds of training & development programs should we choose that will help ensure we are able to attract and retain talented employees, as well as prevent regrettable attrition, within our organization in 2015 and beyond?” What follows is a snapshot of some of the most popular training topics for 2014 and into 2015, along with a brief explanation of how they can each be leveraged to the benefit of the organization.

Up & Coming

Leadership Development

Pointing to the need to refocus attention on the longevity of an organization and the generational shift towards Millenials that is occurring in the overall workforce, leadership development is definitely on the list of hot training topics on the rise.
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20 Common HR Metrics and their Formulas

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20 Common HR Metrics and their Formulas

How often does your HR department measure its effectiveness? HR metrics and measurements can be powerful in showing us areas where we could improve and better meet the needs of our organization and its employees. They can also help provide meaningful data to help us make good decisions for our business and department.

There are an endless array of HR metrics you can use spanning payroll, compensation, benefits, engagement, retention, training, and more – all of which can provide incredible insight into how your HR function is performing. But, some measurements are more important than others depending on your organization’s goals, strategy, and the data it can feasibly track, analyze, and use. Four crucial considerations that HR professionals need to consider when using HR metrics include:
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5 Reasons Why Your Employees Aren't Fully Engaged

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Employee engagement is an employee's involvement with, commitment to, and satisfaction with their work. It is an employee's positive or negative emotional attachment and connection to their job, their coworkers, and their organization. Employees who are the most engaged...

  • love what they do
  • take pride in their organization
  • believe they can make an impact
  • work in the best interests of their organization
  • feel empowered to help move their organization forward
  • initiate new contributions to the organization

But every day, you probably encounter employees who are not fully engaged in their job or your organization. These employees lack full commitment, do not take as much initiative to go above and beyond their job responsibilities, show apathy and passivity, take on fewer projects, participate less, take less pride in the organization, and are not as enthusiastic about their work as they could be.
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3 Things Managers Do That Disengage Employees

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Engagement is often viewed as just an "HR thing" when in fact, managers play an even more important role in engaging employees day-to-day. Managers, however, may not realize how their actions engage or disengage employees and how that affects their team's performance and productivity. Here are 3 things managers do which can unintentionally disengage employees.

1. Devalue

Unfortunately, feeling undervalued is a common problem in the workplace and it affects engagement considerably. Instead of focusing on performance and creating value, employees who feel devalued spend their energy trying to defend or prove their value and typically underperform in the process. There are a number of common reasons and situations that could cause an employee to feel devalued, such as:

  • not being recognized or acknowledged for a job well done, or ignored
  • being passed over for a promotion or transferred/assigned to a new area
  • feeling under-challenged or that they are working below their capabilities
  • receiving a lower than expected pay increase, performance rating, etc.
  • being unfairly treated or denied a request for leave, additional flexibility, etc.
  • not being listened/responded to or asked for their input

Managers usually don't intend to make employees feel devalued, but the absence of acknowledgement and the effects of how they treat other employees or the decisions they make can inevitably backfire and leave employees feeling undervalued and disengaged.

2. Distrust

Trust is also vital to employee engagement. Loss of employee trust in leaders or their managers can create havoc on engagement. Disengaged employees who lose trust in their managers spend more time wondering what truths their managers are trying to hold back from them or questioning their manager's honesty, than creating and driving results.

Managers can lose employees' trust in ways that they may not realize. Saying one thing and doing another is a major reason that trust can be broken. If you promise something to an employee (even if it was years prior), they expect you to follow-through. Keeping your word and being consistent is the best way to keep employees' trust.

Micromanaging or over-controlling how tasks are completed and limiting employees' autonomy can also create distrust. If employees feel like you don't trust or believe in their capabilities, they may reciprocate and not trust you. Trust is a two way street, and you must be willing to give trust to gain it.

Other ways managers create distrust inadvertently are by publically criticizing employees or drawing attention to their weaknesses, keeping secrets and withholding information, making changes without honestly communicating why, telling half-truths, not practicing what they preach, and sugarcoating problems or situations. Every manager makes one of these mistakes at one time or another and the negative effects can be difficult to reverse.

3. Disconnect

Employees become disengaged when they don't have a good connection with their manager, or when a positive dynamic with their boss changes. For many employees, their boss is one of the most important people in their work-life. As a result, positive, supportive relationships between employees and their managers play a critical role in engaging employees.

When employees and managers stop communicating with one another regularly or when a positive manager-employee relationship turns sour, a disconnect can occur. Being able to resolve and manage conflicts with employees is a skill managers need to maintain their relationships and connections with employees.

Sometimes disconnects happen without managers realizing it. For example, managers can commonly grow apart from employees with significant tenure or those that don't need as much development. Also, managers can often find themselves operating in a vacuum, busily engaged in tasks and projects, but failing to make time for their people. They may become invisible to their staff or a particular employee. They may also not spend enough time trying to develop rapport with employees.

Connecting, developing trust, and valuing employees are three key ways managers can drive engagement. In the ongoing quest for an engaged, productive, and high-performing workforce, managers must realize how their everyday actions or lack of action can disengage employees and give them the skills and insights to create an engaged team.

Additional Resources

Management & Leadership Development

ERC offers a range of courses to develop supervisors, middle managers, and leaders including popular topics such as communication, conflict resolution, time and priority management, emotional intelligence, and performance management. 

5 Things that Top Workplaces Do Differently

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Over the years, we’ve found a few simple, but consistent practices that differentiate average employers from top workplaces. Here are 5 things top workplaces do differently than other organizations to attract and retain the best talent.

They make investments where it matters most.

Like many businesses, top workplaces are forced to make tradeoffs in offerings and programs, but keep investing in the things that are most meaningful to their top performers. They don’t just throw money at programs with little value – they know what matters most to their top people and put cash where it counts. For example, they invest wisely in strategic development programs, aimed at advancing their top performers into future leadership roles and growing talent pipelines; reserve funds for meaningful rewards to show appreciation to their top people for jobs well done; keep their compensation practices updated and competitive; and also don’t skimp on basic benefits.

They keep their people passionate and engaged in their work.

Top workplaces keep their top performers motivated on the job and passionate about their work, and for these reasons, it’s no wonder that these organizations employ individuals that are more engaged, innovative, and successful than other employers. The best places to work have found simple, but creative ways to engage their top performers through the work itself – spending plenty of time on job design, getting employees involved in brainstorming and implementing ideas, encouraging and coordinating personal development, moving employees into new jobs and roles, and giving employees the autonomy they need to do their best work. Instead of spending time rolling out elaborate motivational tools and programs, they focus on keeping the work fresh and exciting.

They talk to and interact with their employees.

Take a walk through any top workplace and you’ll notice a different climate than other organizations, specifically leaders and managers talking to their employees and engaging with top performers and not huddled in meetings all day with their management teams. You may even notice leaders mentoring employees, recognizing them on the spot, working side-by-side with staff, or participating in an on-boarding event. They aren’t leading from the corner office, but rather from their daily examples. The best places to work simply talk to and interact with their top talent more often than other employers, request their feedback and involvement in the business, and as a result understand what makes them tick. Consequently, their top people feel more valued by the highest levels of the organization, and develop strong relationships with their managers.

They respect and support employees’ personal time.

In an age where businesses and employees are faced with greater challenges, demands, and stressors and fewer resources, top workplaces are realizing that employees have greater needs for support in their work/life – whether those are balancing family responsibilities, pursuing personal goals, improving their well-being, or dealing with losses and other personal circumstances. These organizations take steps to ensure that their top people are able to balance their personal and work lives by addressing workload issues, offering flexible scheduling, providing support services and generous leave, and using a supportive approach in the workplace.

They build and sustain a great culture and work environment.

Ask any top performer: a major reason they love their organization is the work culture. It’s the unique work environment and the people inside the organization that keep many top performers happy and satisfied. In fact, culture is perhaps the most frequently cited “reason for staying” at their organizations. Top workplaces are able to create cultures and work environments that their top people grow to cherish and don’t want to leave. Described as positive, fun, supportive, flexible, collaborative, open, and performance-based, top workplaces have cultures that attract the very best talent. These organizations have a knack for sustaining these cultures through the many ups and downs of business and as their workforce changes.

Many employers believe that creating a top workplace means offering all the bells and whistles, and that their quest is out of reach. Yet our research continues to show that these simple strategies can make all the difference when building a great workplace to attract and retain the very best talent.

For more information about Northeast Ohio’s top workplaces, the 2011 NorthCoast 99 winners, please visit www.northcoast99.com. In addition, for more information about the NorthCoast 99 winners’ best practices, please click here

9 Best Practices for Employee Engagement Initiatives

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A successful employee engagement initiative can make lasting and effective changes in the workplace.

Here are nine (9) best practices for your employee engagement initiatives. 

Collect data.

Conduct a regular employee engagement survey either every year or every other year. Organizations that consistently measure and track how well they are engaging employees are better able to assess areas of strength and opportunity in their workplaces to impact engagement. Most organizations that evaluate employee engagement survey employees at least every other year. If your organization is smaller, it may consider conducting a more informal benchmark for employee engagement such as interviews or one-on-one meetings.

Seek an external comparison.

Benchmark how well your workplace practices compare to other organizations. An external comparison is as important as an internal benchmark. You’ll need to know how your organization’s practices relative to engaging employees stack up against other organizations, particularly with those you are competing for talent. Market surveys, great workplace programs, and other audits can all provide helpful external benchmark information. Some organizations that conduct employee engagement surveys also provide normative comparisons.

Identify overall drivers.

Know the drivers of employee engagement at your organization. Drivers are simply those aspects that are most commonly and significantly driving employee engagement either up or down at your organization. There are many different facets of the workplace experience that influence engagement to varying degrees, but your resources and time are limited so you need to know which aspects are most important. By identifying the true drivers of engagement for your organization, you can focus your efforts on the things that matter most to your workforce and top people. A good employee engagement strategy is all about targeting the right things – not everything.

Identify individual drivers.

Many engagement initiatives fall short of identifying individual drivers of employee engagement - largely because this responsibility should fall on managers and supervisors. Managers and supervisors need to find out what engages each of their employees, and particularly their top people, through observation and conversations. These insights can be gleaned through day to day interactions, performance management, and communication. However, most managers and supervisors just aren’t attuned or trained to recognize what engagement is and why it matters. Your responsibility is to ensure that they have the right skills and resources to positively impact engagement.

Keep it relatively simple.

Scoring which is difficult to understand or results that includes too many segments or breakouts of data can detract from obtaining value in the process. If you conduct engagement surveys, make sure the scoring can be easily understood by those interpreting the results. Also, keep data segments and breakouts to a minimum so that the initiative does not become about “fixing” certain people, departments, or areas of business, but rather improving the engagement of employees.

Meet and discuss engagement with your leaders.

Once a survey, feedback, and/or benchmarking initiative had been conducted to evaluate employee engagement and how you compare internally and externally, it’s important to meet and discuss the results with your leaders. This ensures that engagement is seen as part of the larger business strategy and receives support. Key tips for creating this dialogue include: create an executive summary to help them digest the information obtained, tie the results back to issues of importance to them (business strategy, etc.), back your points with data and numbers, and provide recommendations for how to improve engagement. Another way you can make the results meaningful to your leaders is by providing segments of information that are important to them – such as engagement scores by the business’ divisions. The most successful engagement projects we’ve seen are those that are conducted with leadership support and participation from initial communications and analysis of the results to action planning.

Set goals aligned with employee engagement.

Having an employee engagement-focused strategy can help you set goals for your department and organization. Common goals that impact employee engagement include increasing employee engagement scores by a certain percentage, reducing voluntary turnover, enhancing communications effectiveness, increasing development opportunities, or even impacting the bottom line. Whatever these goals may be, they should be in line with the drivers of engagement and the areas of need. In turn, you should be able to tie these goals back to the larger business strategy. Be able to address why each goal is important to the business’ direction to gain support.

Create action plans, on-going conversations, forums, and follow-up.

Once you’ve set goals to improve employee engagement, create action plans to impact those goals.  We find that there tends to be a great deal of momentum initially right after an engagement survey that can become lost over time. To ensure that your goals are met and receive the support they need to be successful, create action plans with specific timetables, roles, and accountabilities. Additionally, if employee engagement is truly an important organizational initiative, it should permeate your organization and drive the actions of HR, managers, and leaders. Many organizations have on-going conversations and forums to discuss employee engagement and keep going back to the survey data.

Implement changes.

Lastly, implementing changes in an employee engagement initiative is crucial. Your organization should follow-up on the areas needing improvement either through direct change or acknowledgement of employees’ feedback, especially prior to surveying them in the future. If you plan to ask employees for their feedback – be prepared to respond because not making changes can lead to negative effects. It’s always a good practice to make any small changes quickly and to save the larger changes for later.

Additional Resources

Employee Engagement Surveys
ERC’s services are used by many local employers to gauge their employees’ engagement, identify drivers of engagement, benchmark scores to other local organizations, and help you translate the data into real, actionable changes. Click here to learn more.

NorthCoast 99
Benchmark how your organization’s workplace practices surrounding the attraction, retention, and engagement of employees compare to other employers by applying for the NorthCoast 99 award. All applicants receive free benchmark reports just for applying. 

Supervisory/Managerial Training
Are your supervisors and managers equipped to engage employees? Give them the right skills and competencies to impact engagement. Click here to learn more.